CSS Vendor Prefixes or CSS3 browser prefixes

CSS vendor prefixes or CSS browser prefixes are a way for browser makers to add support for new CSS features in a sort of testing and experimentation period. Browser prefixes are used to add new features that may not be part of a formal specification and to implement features in a specification that hasn’t been finalized. read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…

CSS-Vendor-Prefixes-or-CSS3-browser-prefixes

The CSS browser prefixes are:

  • Android: -webkit-
  • Chrome: -webkit-
  • Firefox: -moz-
  • Internet Explorer: -ms-
  • iOS: -webkit-
  • Opera: -o-
  • Safari: -webkit-

In most cases, to use a more advanced CSS style property, you take the standard CSS property and add the prefix above for each browser. read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…
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CSS3 Inheritance Tips and Tricks – inherit, initial & unset

It’s easy to overlook the cascading features of style-sheets. Most designers/developers are aware of the inherit keyword but there are a few new inheritance features in CSS3 you may not be aware of…  read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…

css3-inheritance-tips-and-tricks-inherit-initial-unset

property: inherit;

The inherit keyword means “use whatever value is assigned to my parent”. If no value was explicitly defined on the parent element, the browser works up the DOM tree until the property is found. Ultimately, it ends at the browser  read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…
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Responsive CSS design – Web Design Tips

For designers, the most difficult and interesting aspect of responsive web design has been the flexible nature of it. We’ve constantly in the process of trading in our tenacity for pixel perfection and embracing the web for what it really is; fluid. Today we’ll cover some steps to help you transition towards flexible web design, or as I like to call it, ‘Getting’ Flexy’.

Responsive CSS for a web site will increase a websites visitors by attracting the mobile and tablet visitors also along with the visitors who enjoy their post in desktop version.Now the number of people who are using the tablets and mobiles to browse the web are increasing. Hence a web page layout should be adaptable for all the view port of the device in which the visitor views the webpage.Some of the tips and tricks for the designers to keep in mind when they design a responsive webpages are given below. This will be a prefect resource for responsive web design tutorial in web.
responsive-css-design-tips

First, the basics

Responsive web design, as introduced has three core principles:

  • Flexible grids: percentage-based fluid columns of content.
  • Media queries: a magical tool to change your CSS based on the browser’s current state.
  • Flexible media: content such as images and video should scale with the browser’s dimensions.

You’ll notice that two of those ingredients have the phrase ‘flexible’. This is the key differentiation of responsive web design versus other web design approaches. Let’s look at how to become flexible.

Never use maximum-scale

Occasionally, in an attempt to override an orientation bug in iOS, web developers will add maximum-scale=1 to their meta name=”viewport” tag. Don’t do this. The unfortunate result is that users are unable zoom the page (using a pinch-zoom gesture). This is a bad practice and a huge accessibility concern. If you want your site to be ‘flexy’, it has to be zoom-able.

Do this: you win the internet!

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">

This will inform the browser to set the window width to the device’s width without overriding any user needs. Then in your CSS, add this brand new at-rule:

/* You'll need prefixes. @-ms-viewport, @-o-viewport, etc... */
@viewport {
width: device-width;
}

This is an in-progress W3C spec written to move this viewport information over to CSS. IE10 and Opera browsers support this. Go ahead and start rolling this into production sites.

Responsive Images:

Making the height and the width of the images to auto is best for responsive webpages (should be used).

Also make sure always using a compressed image. Because images of 5mb or above are produced when captured from Digital cams. It will take time to load in mobile internet. Hence make sure you compress the image before you use it in the website.

Some of the sites found in the web

http://www.imageoptimizer.net

http://jpeg-optimizer.com/

Mobile Navigation Menu:

Navigation menu for mobile should be redesigned when the page is viewed in a smaller width.You could see how the menu is re aligned in this demo, when the width is reduced. Some responsive mobile navigation menus are available in internet.

http://webdesignerwall.com/demo/mobile-nav/

Relative Positioning Of Elements:

Every element in the html is relative to another.Thus it is much flexible when the browser width gets changed. In the this demo header and side menu positions are relative. That gives the flexibility for the menus to get aligned below the header when the width is reduced.

Relative Font Size & Usage Of Percentage:

Instead of using px for the font sizes em is used .Thus the font size reduces relatively when the font size of the header or some other html element reduces. Percentages should be used instead of px.

Example: instead of setting as 1000px , 100% or 90% should be set based on the requirement. Thus the website scales based on the width. The most common example is font-size, if you wanted to set a heading font-size (20px) based on your body font-size (10px) in em units.

Don’t use px units, use em units

The px vs em debate is a long one but em units have proven themselves useful in responsive web design. Using em units should be familiar to most web developers, but worth reviewing. An em unit is a relative unit of measurement based on the parent element.

Keep it relative: typography

Setting your type in em units enables you to use the power of CSS to build a scale-able typographic system that grows with the viewport.

body { font: 100%/1.5 serif; /* 16px */  }
h1 {  font-size: 2em; /* 32px */ }

@media (min-width: 600px) {
body { font: 112.5%; /* 18px */  }
h1 {    /* Do nothing! I'll automatically be 36px */ }
}

Based on personal experience, this will save you hours per project versus going through and updating pixel values. Also, it has an accessibility benefit when a user adjusts their font size.

Keep it relative: white-space

Additionally, using em units for padding and margin helps create a vertical base for your design. At larger screen dimensions you can insert more white-space into your design in a healthy, consistent manner without too much labour.

#hero { margin-bottom: 1em; }

@media (min-width: 600px) {
#hero { margin-bottom: 2em; }
}

Using em units will help you preserve a balanced system of relative proportions. For a more advanced approach on relative sizing,

Min-Width & Max-Width with CSS Media Queries:

Min-width and Max-width should be mentioned in the CSS along with the width.Thus imposing a constraint for the widths are better suited for scale-ability for its width.media queries should be added with the min-width or max-width as condition to display certain elements.

Media queries are so important for a responsive css design.

@media screen and (max-width:320px)
{
    .ad_bar{ display: none }
}

In the above code we are making the ads to disappear when the display device width is below 320px. By this we way we provide a better readability of the content in mobile devices.

max-width min-width
‘Desktop down’ ‘Mobile first’
Start large, dig down Start small, build up
Good for legacy sites Future friendly

Go forth and be flexy!

These are just the basics on the path towards fluid width nirvana. It’s important to remember that we’re all learning and it’s OK to make mistakes. I encourage you, if you haven’t already, to take the plunge and build out your own responsive design. The day when most websites sit on a flexible frame and are universally accessible by any device is hopefully fast approaching. Help the web become a better place.

If you have any more suggestions to be added , feel free to comment below.
view demo

 

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Cool inset Text Effect with CSS3 Text-Shadow

So, I have seen a few tutorials online about using text-shadow to create a basic inset text effect, but they are all lacking the real design aspect that makes the type look like it is actually INSET. That aspect is the inner shadow.

Introduction

I played around with trying to hack box-shadow into background-image in the same way that you can add linear gradients to text, but to no avail.

Well, in any case, I finally was able to get something to work, and yes, it is pretty killer.


insetText

That’s it right there. But, let’s take a look at how and why this works.

First let’s start with defining our class and setting our font. We have styled our div and our body and now we want this text to look like it is stamped into to page.

The CSS

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
}

The next step we want to take is to set the background-color of the text to the color that we want the inset to be. So…

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
}

Next, we are going to use the background-clip CSS3 property to create a clipping mask using the text to mask the background. Now if you are a designer, you probably already know how a clipping mask works. The color black is transparent to the background and the color white is opaque. Thus, the image behind the mask will show through on only the black parts and the white parts will ‘clip’ it. Remember that, because it’s important.

Remember, CSS3 is not standard yet and may not be supported in older browsers. For now, it’s best to use the standard AND browser specific properties for any CSS3, so…

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
	-moz-background-clip: text;
	background-clip: text;
}

Now, I know. It doesn’t look like that did anything, whatsoever. We are back where we started, right? Wrong, in truth, the background color has been clipped behind the text, so it only shows through where the text is. The problem is that the browser default CSS is to make text black. So, now we simply use color to make the text transparent.

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
	-moz-background-clip: text;
	background-clip: text;
        color: transparent;
}

Now we’re getting somewhere. We have taken transparent text and used it to clip it’s grey background. Here is where the magic happens. We will use the text-shadow property with rgba colors. Since the text is transparent, the entire shadow, even what is normally hidden by the text in front of it, will show. If we offset the shadow vertically, it will appear as if it is on the inside of the text. And if we blur the edges, it should actually appear like an inset shadow, since the darker clipped background fading into the white shadow right? And the shadow that falls outside of the clipping mask should appear to glow slightly, since that it’s closer in color to the contrasting background! So…

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
	-moz-background-clip: text;
	background-clip: text;
        color: transparent;
        text-shadow: rgba(255,255,255,1.0) 0px 3px 3px;
}

Yeah, that looks pretty good, right? I just don’t like how the inside of the text in now white. It looks kind of unnatural, and it really takes away from the outer glow that gives it the inset look. So let’s revise our shadow color by dropping it’s opacity or ‘a’ value to 0.5. Like so…

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
	-moz-background-clip: text;
	background-clip: text;
        color: transparent;
        text-shadow: rgba(255,255,255,0.5) 0px 3px 3px;
}

Perfect! Now we have a completely CSS based inset text effect! We can now add this class to any text element on our websites, without having to open Photoshop or Illustrator, create the document, design the effect, save the image, upload the image, and then place the image in our markup where it will slow down our load time. You would add this to your markup like so…

<h1>This is inset text</h1>

This solution is great for headings. The smaller you make your text the smaller you will need to make your text-shadow.

NOTE: This method is currently only supported by Webkit browser like Google Chrome and Apple Safari.

Thanks for reading, and I hope this helped!

view demo

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

CSS3 3D effect, Shine text with css3 keyframe animation, Scrolling Page Background with jQuery – Happy New Year

On the occasion of New Year 2013, I thought to wish this festival by creating a nice webpage greeting. So, today I created this greeting card using 3D  and shining text effect with the help of CSS3, and scrolling background with JavaScript. I hope you all will enjoy this holiday as well as my web-card too :) .

Introduction

Greeting, today we are going to make a scrolling background effect. This script will move the background of any html tag, either vertically or horizontally. I used this script in one of my greeting card too which has a blue sky with clouds and it makes the whole website came alive. I think that’s pretty impressive. In this card you will find texts with different CSS effects like: 3D emboss, continuous spotlight shine effect, text shadow etc.

3d-shine-text-css3-scrolling-background-happy-new-year

The CSS

I have Used multiple text-shadows to create 3D text on any HTML element. No extra HTML, no extra headaches, just awesomesauce.
Works in the latest builds of Safari, Chrome, Firefox, and Opera.

h1 {
  margin:1.2em auto;
  font: bold 100px/1 "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
  color: #fff;
  text-shadow: 0 1px 0 #cccccc, 0 2px 0 #c9c9c9, 0 3px 0 #bbbbbb, 0 4px 0 #b9b9b9, 0 5px 0 #aaaaaa, 0 6px 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1), 0 0 5px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1), 0 1px 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3), 0 3px 5px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 5px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25), 0 10px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 20px 20px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15);
  -webkit-transition: .2s all linear;
}

Text shine Effect created with WebKit-specific CSS3 properties. You’ll need Safari or Chrome to enjoy key-frame animation.

p.shine{
    font-size: 3em;
    margin: 0 auto; padding:0;
    width: 95%;
}
.shine{
    background: #222 -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right top, from(#ccc), to(#fff), color-stop(1, #f0f)) 0 0 no-repeat;
    background-size: 400px; -webkit-background-size: 400px; 
    -moz-background-size: 400px; -o-background-size: 400px;    
    color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.7);	
    background-clip: text; -webkit-background-clip: text; 
        -moz-background-clip: text; -o-background-clip: text;	
	-webkit-animation: shine 2s infinite;
	-moz-animation: shine 2s infinite;
	-o-animation: shine 2s infinite;
	-ms-animation: shine 2s infinite;
	animation: shine 2s infinite; 
}

@-webkit-keyframes shine{
    0%{background-position: top left;}
    100%{background-position: top right;}
}
@-moz-keyframes shine{
    0%{background-position: top left;}
    100%{background-position: top right;}
}
@-o-keyframes shine{
    0%{background-position: top left;}
    100%{background-position: top right;}
}
@keyframes shine{
    0%{background-position: top left;}
    100%{background-position: top right;}
}

For page background I used cloud in png format.

body{background:url(bg_clouds.png) 0 0}

The HTML

<h1>Happy New Year 2013</h1>
<p class="shine">The New Year is the time of unfolding horizons and the realization of dreams, may you rediscover new strength and garner faith with you, and be able to rejoice in the simple pleasures that life has to offer and put a brave front for all the challenges that may come your way.<br>
Wishing you a lovely New Year..</p>

The JavaScript – jQuery

We have to add jquery library in body first, after that we animate our page background with css background-position properties. I always prefer to use JavaScript files before close of body tag.

<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">var scrollSpeed = 70; 
    var current = 0;
    function bgscroll(){
        current -= 1;   
        // move the background with backgrond-position css properties
        $('body').css("backgroundPosition", 1 ? current+"px 0" : "0 " + current+"px");   
    }
     setInterval(bgscroll, scrollSpeed);   </script>

view demo

Happy New Year!

I hope you like the result and don’t hesitate to share your thoughts about it. Thanks for reading!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Rotating Words With CSS Animations – CSS3 Keyframes Animation Example

In today’s tutorial we’ll create another typography effect. The idea is to have some kind of sentence and to rotate a part of it. We’ll be “exchanging” certain words of that sentence using CSS animations.
Please note: the result of this tutorial will only work as intended in browsers that support CSS animations.
So let’s start!

In the following, we’ll be going through demo.

rotating-words-css-animations

THE HTML

We’ll have a main wrapper with a h2 heading that contains first-level spans and two divisions for the rotating words:

<section class="rw-wrapper">
	<h2 class="rw-sentence">
		<span>Real poetry is like</span>
		<br />
		<span>creating beautiful butterflies</span>
		<br />
		<span>with a silent touch of</span>
		<div class="rw-words rw-words-1">
			<span>spice</span>
			<span>colors</span>
			<span>happiness</span>
			<span>wonder</span>
			<span>sugar</span>
			<span>happiness</span>
		</div>
	</h2>
</section>

Now, ignoring the garbage placeholder text, we want each span of the rw-word to appear at a time. For that we’ll be using CSS animations. We’ll create one animation for each division and each span will run it, just with different delays.
So, let’s look at the CSS.

THE CSS3

First, we will style the main wrapper and center it on the page:

.rw-wrapper{
	width: 80%;
	position: relative;
	margin: 110px auto 0 auto;
	font-family: 'Bree Serif';
	padding: 10px;
	height: 400px;
	overflow: hidden;
}

We’ll add some text shadow to all the elements in the heading:

.rw-sentence{
	margin: 0;
	text-align: left;
	text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px rgba(255,255,255,0.8);
}

And add some specific text styling to the spans:

.rw-sentence span{
	color: #444;
	white-space: nowrap;
	font-size: 200%;
	font-weight: normal;
}

The divisions will be displayed as inline elements, that will allow us to “insert” them into the sentence without breaking the flow:

.rw-words{
	display: inline;
	text-indent: 10px;
}

Each span inside of a rw-words div will be positioned absolutely and we’ll hide any overflow:

.rw-words span{
	position: absolute;
	opacity: 0;
	overflow: hidden;
	color: #888;
	-webkit-transform-origin: 10% 75%;
	-moz-transform-origin: 10% 75%;
	-ms-transform-origin: 10% 75%;
	-o-transform-origin: 10% 75%;
	transform-origin: 10% 75%;
}

Now, we’ll run two animations. As mentioned previously, we’ll run the same animation for all the spans in one div, just with different delays:

.rw-words-1 span{
	animation: rotateWord 16s linear infinite 0s;
}
.rw-words-2 span{
    animation: rotateWordsSecond 18s linear infinite 0s;
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(2) {
	animation-delay: 3s; 
	color: #6b889d;
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(3) {
	animation-delay: 6s; 
	color: #6b739d;	
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(4) {
	animation-delay: 9s; 
	color: #7a6b9d;
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(5) {
	animation-delay: 12s; 
	color: #8d6b9d;
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(6) {
	animation-delay: 15s; 
	color: #9b6b9d;
}

Our animations will run one cycle, meaning that each span will be shown once for three seconds, hence the delay value. The whole animation will run 6 (number of images) * 3 (appearance time) = 18 seconds.
We will need to set the right percentage for the opacity value (or whatever makes the span appear). Dividing 6 by 18 gives us 0.333… which would be 33% for our keyframe step. Everything that we want to happen to the span needs to happen before that. So, after tweaking and seeing what fits best, we come up with the following animation (Fade in and “fall”) for the first words:

@keyframes rotateWord {
    0% { opacity: 0; }
    5% { opacity: 1; }
    17% { opacity: 1; transform: rotate(0deg); }
	19% { opacity: 1; transform: rotate(98deg); }
	21% { opacity: 1; transform: rotate(86deg); }
	23% { opacity: 1; transform: translateY(85px) rotate(83deg); }
	25% { opacity: 0; transform: translateY(170px) rotate(80deg); }
	80% { opacity: 0; }
    100% { opacity: 0; }
}

We’ll fade in the span and we’ll also animate its height.
The animation for the words in the second div will fade in and animate their width. We added a bit to the keyframe step percentages here, because we want these words to appear just a tiny bit later than the ones of the first word:

@keyframes rotateWordsSecond {
    0% { opacity: 1; animation-timing-function: ease-in; width: 0px; }
    10% { opacity: 0.3; width: 0px; }
    20% { opacity: 1; width: 100%; }
    27% { opacity: 0; width: 100%; }
    100% { opacity: 0; }
}

css3-animations-rotating-words

And that’s it folks! There are many possibilities for the animations, you can check out the demo and see what can be applied!
I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and find it inspiring!
view demo

 

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Animated 3D Bouncing Ball with CSS3, Html5

Hi guys! Today we are going to see another great example of how to use the power of CSS3. We will start by creating a very cool and realistic 3D ball with pure CSS3 properties, and add a little CSS3 animations for giving the ball a “bouncing” effect.

Please note: the result of this tutorial will only work as intended in browsers that support the respective CSS properties (gradient, shadow, border-radius, keyframe animation).css-3d-bouncing-ball

THE HTML

Let’s start with some very basic HTML:

<div id="ballWrapper">
     <div id="ball"></div>
     <div id="ballShadow"></div>
</div>

What we have here are 3 simple DIV elements. “#ballWrapper” is the main DIV which wraps the ball. This DIV will determine the ball’s position and height on the screen. Next, we have the “#ball” element which is the ball markup, and finally there is the “#ballShadow” which holds the ball’s shadow separately from the ball itself.

THE CSS

First, we’ll want to set a basic width and height to our ‘#ballWrapper’ DIV. It will help us position it to the center of the screen:

#ballWrapper {
    width: 140px;
    height: 300px;
    position: fixed;
    left: 50%;
    top: 50%;
    margin: -150px 0 0 -70px;
}

Note that I gave the DIV both top and left position properties of  ‘50%’, and a negative top and left margin which is calculated to be exactly half of the original height and width of the DIV. That way we can center the ball on the screen.

Next in line, let’s give our ball some styles (grow up, it’s not that funny… :])

#ball {
    width: 140px;
    height: 140px;
    border-radius: 70px;
    background: linear-gradient(top,  rgba(187,187,187,1) 0%,rgba(119,119,119,1) 99%);
    box-shadow: inset 0 -5px 15px rgba(255,255,255,0.4), 
                inset -2px -1px 40px rgba(0,0,0,0.4), 
                0 0 1px #000;   
}

We are giving the ball equal width and height and a ‘border-radius‘ property with a value of  ’70px’ (which is half of the original width and height we’ve set) so it will be a ball and not an oval shape.

Another thing you’ll notice is the background. I gave the ball’s element a linear background and 3 different box shadow levels so it would get the 3D effect. The first box shadow level is for the dark shadowing at the bottom of the ball (see image). Then, we have the second level that is responsible for the blurry glow – again, at the bottom of the ball. Finally the third level is a hardly noticeable blurry shadow behind the contours of the ball.

If you take a look at the ball you’ll notice that there is another small oval shape on top of the ball that gives it a reflection effect. Here is how I created it:

#ball::after {
    content: "";
    width: 80px; 
    height: 40px; 
    position: absolute;
    left: 30px;
    top: 10px;  
    background: linear-gradient(top,  rgba(232,232,232,1) 0%,rgba(232,232,232,1) 1%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%);
    border-radius: 40px / 20px; 
}

I used the CSS pseudo element ::after and gave it a linear gradient with an opacity. In addition, I’ve set the border radius to  ’40px / 20px’ so it has an oval shape.
Next, let’s handle the ball’s shadow:

#ballShadow {
    width: 60px;
    height: 75px;
    position: absolute;
    z-index: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 50%;
    margin-left: -30px;
    background: rgba(20, 20, 20, .1);
    box-shadow: 0px 0 20px 35px rgba(20,20,20,.1);
    border-radius: 30px / 40px; 
}

view demo

Again, I used the same properties for centering the shadow, but this time I pinned it to the bottom of ‘#ballWrapper’. I also added a semi-transparent background to it, a fitting box shadow and a border radius.

THE BOUNCING ANIMATION

Now let’s take a look at the fun stuff…

I’ll start by adding the animation property to our ball:

#ball {
    animation: jump 1s infinite;
}

All I did was to define the animation’s name (jump), the animation’s duration (1 second) and how many times the animation will happen – in our case we use ‘infinite’ which means that it will run forever.
The animation itself:

@keyframes jump {
    0% {
        top: 0;
    }
    50% {
        top: 140px;
        height: 140px;
    }
    55% {
        top: 160px; 
        height: 120px; 
        border-radius: 70px / 60px;
    }
    65% {
        top: 120px; 
        height: 140px; 
        border-radius: 70px;
    }
    95% {
        top: 0;
    }
    100% {
        top: 0;
    }
}

So, basically what I’m doing here is to play with the ‘top’ position property of the ball.  Starting from 0, through 160 and back to 0. You’ll notice that in the middle of the animation I’m also playing with the ‘border-radius’ property – that way I handle the “impact” of the ball on the ground.

And now the ball’s shadow; first let’s add the shadow’s relevant animation property:

#ballShadow {
    animation: shrink 1s infinite;
}

I used the same values that I used with the ball, only with a different keyframes animation called shrink which looks as follows:

@-keyframes shrink {
    0% {
        bottom: 0;
        margin-left: -30px;
        width: 60px;
        height: 75px;
        background: rgba(20, 20, 20, .1);
        box-shadow: 0px 0 20px 35px rgba(20,20,20,.1);
        border-radius: 30px / 40px;
    }
    50% {
        bottom: 30px;
        margin-left: -10px;
        width: 20px;
        height: 5px;
        background: rgba(20, 20, 20, .3);
        box-shadow: 0px 0 20px 35px rgba(20,20,20,.3);
        border-radius: 20px / 20px;
    }
    100% {
        bottom: 0;
        margin-left: -30px;
        width: 60px;
        height: 75px;
        background: rgba(20, 20, 20, .1);
        box-shadow: 0px 0 20px 35px rgba(20,20,20,.1);
        border-radius: 30px / 40px;
    }
}

In the shadow’s animation I played with different properties then in the ball’s animation. In order to give it all a realistic effect when it comes to the ball’s distance from the floor, I needed to animate the shadow width, height and opacity. While the ball is close to the floor, the shadow needs to be darker and smaller. When the ball jumps up, the shadow should be lighter and bigger.

Last, but not least, let’s add the “click effect” to the ball which makes it appear as if it moves away from us when we click and hold. To achieve this effect, all we have to use is the ‘:active’ pseudo-class, add a transition and play with the CSS3 transform ‘scale’ property like this:

#ballWrapper {
    transform: scale(1);
    transition: all 5s linear 0s;
}

#ballWrapper:active {
    transform: scale(0);
}

The transition from a transform value of scale(1) to scale(0) will make it look as if the element is moving away from you.

view demo

That’s it!

I hope you enjoyed this article and if you have questions, comments, or suggestions, let me know! Thanks for reading.

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar