Animated bubbles upwards continuously with pure CSS

Here is a pure CSS experimental work to create floating bubbles without using JavaScript. These animated bubbles are also with popping effect. All these animation is created by Pure CSS.

For our little demo, we use a simple image for the conical flask and then create the bubbles entirely with markup and CSS. read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…

Animated bubbles upwards continuously with pure CSS

The HTML

<div id="beaker">
  <span class="bubble">
    <span class="glow"> </span>
  </span>
</div>

With our bubbles all made, now we need them to act like bubbles. We could use JavaScript but that’s no fun. Just use CSS! read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…read-more-button

CSS Vendor Prefixes or CSS3 browser prefixes

CSS vendor prefixes or CSS browser prefixes are a way for browser makers to add support for new CSS features in a sort of testing and experimentation period. Browser prefixes are used to add new features that may not be part of a formal specification and to implement features in a specification that hasn’t been finalized. read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…

CSS-Vendor-Prefixes-or-CSS3-browser-prefixes

The CSS browser prefixes are:

  • Android: -webkit-
  • Chrome: -webkit-
  • Firefox: -moz-
  • Internet Explorer: -ms-
  • iOS: -webkit-
  • Opera: -o-
  • Safari: -webkit-

In most cases, to use a more advanced CSS style property, you take the standard CSS property and add the prefix above for each browser. read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…
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Javascript or jQuery Fullscreen browser window – Html5 technology

The new html5 technology – fullscreen API gives us an easy way to present a web page content in full-screen mode. We are about to give you detailed information about the fullscreen mode. Just try to imagine about all possible advantages which you can get using this technology – full-screen photo albums, videos, and even games. But before we describe this new technology, I have to note that this technology is experimental, and not all the browsers support it.
read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…

javascript-jquery-fullscreen-browser-window-html5-technology

Starting the full-screen mode

Due to the fact that this mode is supported by different browsers differently, we have to foresee all the cases: read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…

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Animated Color wheel spinning with CSS3 Keyframes animation, Transform and Transition

I have done some experimental work to create CSS3 Animation without using JavaScript. I end up creating some animations using CSS3 Keyframes and Transform and like to share. I have done this animation using border-color tricks and CSS Transform: i.e. CSS scale and CSS3 rotation.

Note: Before going I like to make something clear, Internet Explorer 10, Firefox, and Opera supports the @keyframes rule and animation property. Chrome and Safari requires the prefix -webkit- in css.

Important: Internet Explorer 9, and earlier versions, does not support the @keyframe rule or animation property.

css3-keyframes-color-wheel-animation

The HTML

<div id="colorWheel">
    <span class="color01"></span>
    <span class="color02"></span>
    <span class="color03"></span>
    <span class="color04"></span>
    <span class="color05"></span>
    <span class="color06"></span>
    <span class="color07"></span>
    <span class="color08"></span>
    <span class="color09"></span>
    <span class="color10"></span>
</div>

The CSS

Now, We will use some CSS Technique using border-color tricks and CSS3 rotation. I have created this color cycle without using any image.  I have done a cool rotating wheel animation  using @keyframes animation.

#colorWheel {
    height: 100px;
    width: 100px;
    margin: 40px auto ;
    position: absolute; left:10%;
    -webkit-transform-origin: 50px 150px;
    -moz-transform-origin: 50px 150px;
    -ms-transform-origin: 50px 150px;
    -o-transform-origin: 50px 150px;
    transform-origin: 50px 150px;
    -webkit-transition: all 0.5s linear;
    -moz-transition: all 0.5s linear;
    -ms-transition: all 0.5s linear;
    -o-transition: all 0.5s linear;
    transition: all 0.5s linear;
    animation: wheel 10s ease-in-out infinite alternate;
    -moz-animation: wheel 10s ease-in-out infinite alternate;
    -webkit-animation: wheel 10s ease-in-out infinite alternate;
    -ms-animation: wheel 10s ease-in-out infinite alternate;
}

@keyframes wheel{
    0%{
    opacity:1;
    left:-10%;
    transform:scale(.6) rotate(0deg);
}
50%{
    opacity:.7}
100%{
    left: 90%;
    opacity:1;
    transform:scale(1) rotate(2160deg);
}
}
@-webkit-keyframes wheel{
    0%{
    opacity:1;
    left:-10%;
    -webkit-transform:scale(.6) rotate(0deg);
}
50%{
    opacity:.7;}
100%{
    left: 90%;
    opacity:1;
    -webkit-transform:scale(1) rotate(2160deg);
}
}
@-moz-keyframes wheel{
0%{
    opacity:1;
    left:-10%;
    -moz-transform:scale(.6) rotate(0deg);
}
50%{
    opacity:.7;}
100%{
    left: 90%;
    opacity:1;
    -moz-transform:scale(1) rotate(2160deg);
}
}
@-ms-keyframes wheel{
0%{
    opacity:1;
    left:-10%;
    -ms-transform:scale(.6) rotate(0deg);
}
50%{
    opacity:.7;}
100%{
    left: 90%;
    opacity:1;
    -ms-transform:scale(1) rotate(2160deg);
}
}

#colorWheel:hover {}
#colorWheel span {
    position: absolute;
    -webkit-transform-origin: 50% 50%;
    border-style: solid;
    border-width: 150px 50px;
    box-sizing: border-box;
}
#colorWheel span.color01 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(0deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(0deg);
    transform: rotate(0deg);
    border-color: #43a1cd transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color02 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(36deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(36deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(36deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(36deg);
    transform: rotate(36deg);
    border-color: #639b47 transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color03 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(72deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(72deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(72deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(72deg);
    transform: rotate(72deg);
    border-color: #9ac147 transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color04 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(108deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(108deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(108deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(108deg);
    transform: rotate(108deg);
    border-color: #e1e23b transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color05 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(144deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(144deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(144deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(144deg);
    transform: rotate(144deg);
    border-color: #f7941e transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color06 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(180deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(180deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(180deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(180deg);
    transform: rotate(180deg);
    border-color: #ba3e2e transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color07 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(216deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(216deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(216deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(216deg);
    transform: rotate(216deg);
    border-color: #9a1d34 transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color08 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(252deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(252deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(252deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(252deg);
    transform: rotate(252deg);
    border-color: #662a6c transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color09 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(288deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(288deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(288deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(288deg);
    transform: rotate(288deg);
    border-color: #272b66 transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel span.color10 {
    -webkit-transform: rotate(324deg);
    -moz-transform: rotate(324deg);
    -ms-transform: rotate(324deg);
    -o-transform: rotate(324deg);
    transform: rotate(324deg);
    border-color: #2d559f transparent transparent transparent;
}
#colorWheel:before {
    content: "";
    width: 300px;
    height: 300px;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: absolute;
    top: -30px;
    left: -130px;
    border-radius: 100%;
    border: 30px solid #ffffff;
    z-index: 100;
    box-shadow:0px 0px 2px 12px rgba(180,180,180,.5)
}
#colorWheel:after {
    content: "";
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: absolute;
    top: 100px;
    left: 0px;
    border-radius: 100%;
    box-shadow:0px 0px 2px 12px rgba(250,250,250,.5);
    background: #444 url(Dhiraj.png); background-size:contain
}

view demo

Your turn

I had already posted some articles of css3 @keyframes animation examples.  Please check some of these beautiful animation with demo below:

I hope you enjoyed this article and the techniques I used. Please share your comments and questions below!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Top 10 Reasons to Start Using HTML5 Right Now…

So you’re still not using HTML5, huh? I guess you probably have your reasons; it’s not fully adopted yet, it doesn’t work in IE, you don’t like users, you’re out of touch or you are just passionately in love with writing strict XHTML code. HTML5 is the revolution that the web needed and the fact is, it is the future whether you like it or not — suck it up and deal. HTML5 isn’t hard to use or understand and even though it’s not fully adopted yet, there are still plenty of reasons to start using it right now — like right after you get done reading this article.

html5-reasons

There are lots of articles touting the use of HTML5 and praising the benefits of it, yes this is another one of those. With all these articles, with Apple pushing it, with Adobe building new dev products around it, and with so many web sites devoted to it, I still talk to fellow designers and developers who haven’t or won’t adopt it for a variety of reasons. I think the main problem is, it still seems like a mysterious creature to many. To many it feels more like the jet pack or the flying car — an awesome idea that is fun to think about but still not practical in its use. Wrong, the reality is that it is extremely practical right now! It’s not the latest Mercedes concept car being towed around form car show to car show, it’s a reality and it’s not going anywhere.

In order to further demystify HTML5 and help these knuckle dragging designers and developers to jump on the bandwagon I’ve put together a top ten list of reasons why we should all be using HTML5 right now. For those that currently use HTML5 this list may not be anything new or ground breaking, but hopefully it will inspire you to share the benefits of HTML5 with others in the community. We’ll do this Letterman countdown style (minus the celebrity presenter) and start with number ten – accessibility.

10 – ACCESSIBILITY

HTML5 makes creating accessible sites easier for two main reasons: semantics and ARIA. The new (some currently available) HTML headings like <header>, <footer>, <nav>, <section>, <aside>, etc. allow screen readers to easily access content. Before, your screen readers had no way to determine what a given <div> was even if you assigned it an ID or Class. With new semantic tags screen readers can better examine the HTML document and create a better experience for those who use them.

ARIA is a W3C spec that is mainly used to assign specific “roles” to elements in an HTML document – essentially creating important landmarks on the page: header, footer, navigation or article, via role attributes. This has been well overlooked and widely under-used mostly due to the fact that it wasn’t valid, however, HTML5 will validate these attributes. Also, HTML5 will have built in roles that can’t be over-ridden making assigning roles a no brainer. For a more in depth discussion on HTML5 and ARIA please visit the WAI.

9 – VIDEO AND AUDIO SUPPORT

Forget about Flash Player and other third party media players, make your videos and audio truly accessible with the new HTML5 <video> and <audio> tags. Getting your media to play correctly has always been pretty much a nightmare, you had to use the and <object> tags and assign a huge list of parameters just to get the thing visible and working correctly. Your media tags just become these nasty, huge chunks of confusing code segments. HTML5′s video and audio tags basically treat them as images; <video src=”url”/>. But what about all those parameters like height, width and autoplay? No worries my good man, just define those attributes in the tag just like any other HTML element: <video src=”url” width=”640px” height=”380px” autoplay/>.

It’s actually that dead simple, however because old evil browsers out there don’t like our HTML5 friend, you’ll need to add a little bit more code to get them working correctly… but this code isn’t nearly as gnarly and messy as the <object> and tags:

<video poster="myvideo.jpg" controls>
 <source src="myvideo.m4v" type="video/mp4" />
 <source src="myvideo.ogg" type="video/ogg" />
</video>

Some resources worth checking out:

8 – DOCTYPE

doctype html

<!DOCTYPE html>

Yup that’s it, that is the doctype, nothing more, nothing less. Pretty simple right? No more cutting and pasting some long unreadable line of code and no more dirty head tags filled with doctype attributes. You can simply and easily type it out and be happy. The really great thing about it though, beyond the simplicity, is that it works in every browser clear back to the dreaded IE6.

7 – CLEANER CODE

If you are passionate about simple, elegant, easy to read code then HTML5 is the beast for you. HTML5 allows you to write clear and descriptive code, semantic code that allows you to easily separate meaning from style and content. Consider this typical and simple header code with navigation:

<div id="header">
<h1>Header Text</h1>
<div id="nav">
<ul>
<li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
<li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
<li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
</ul>
</div>
</div>

So this code is pretty clean and simple? But with HTML5 you can clean this up even more and at the same time give your markup more meaning:

<header>
 <h1>Header Text</h1>
 <nav>
  <ul>
   <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
   <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
   <li><a href="#">Link</a></li>
  </ul>
 </nav>
</header>

With HTML5 you can finally cure your “divitis” and “classitis” by using semantic and HTML headers to describe your content. Previously you would generally just use div’s for every block of content than drop an id or class on it to describe its content but with the new <section>, <article>, <header>, <footer>, <aside> and <nav> tags, HTML5 allows you to code your markup cleaner as well as keep your CSS better organized and happier.

Some resources worth checking out:

6 – SMARTER STORAGE

One of the coolest things about HTML5 is the new local storage feature. It’s a little bit of a cross between regular old cookies and a client-side database. It’s better than cookies because it allows for storage across multiple windows, it has better security and performance and data will persist even after the browser is closed. Because it’s essentially a client side data base you don’t have to worry about the user deleting cookies and it is been adopted by all the popular browsers.

Local storage is great for many things, but it’s one of HTML5 tools that are making web apps possible without third party plugins. Being able to store data in the user’s browser allows you to easily create those app features like: storing user information, the ability to cache data, and the ability to load the user’s previous application state. If you are interested in getting started with local storage, check out Christian Heilmann’s great 24 Ways article from last year —Wrapping Things Nicely with HTML5 Local Storage.

Some more resources worth checking out:

5 – BETTER INTERACTIONS

Awe, we all want better interactions, we all want a more dynamic website that responds to the user and allows the user to enjoy/interact your content instead of just look at it. Enter <canvas>, the drawing HTML5 tag that allows you to do most (if not more) interactive and animated possibilities than the previous rich internet application platforms like Flash.

Beyond <canvas>, HTML5 also comes with a slew of great APIs that allow you to build a better user experience and a beefier, more dynamic web application — here’s a quick list of native APIs:

  • Drag and Drop (DnD)
  • Offline storage database
  • Browser history management
  • document editing
  • Timed media playback

For way more info on these APIs and more native interactive features of HTML5 visit HTML5Doctor.

Some resources worth checking out:

4 – GAME DEVELOPMENT

Yup, that is correct, you can develop games using HTML5′s <canvas> tag. HTML5 provides a great, mobile friendly way to develop fun, interactive games. If you’ve built Flash games before, you’ll love building HTML5 games.

Script-Tutorials has recently offered a four part series of lessons focused on HTML5 game development, head on over and check out some of the sick stuff they have created:

Some more resources worth checking out:

3 – LEGACY/CROSS BROWSER SUPPORT

modern browsers support

Your modern, popular browsers all support HTML5 (Chrome, Firefox, Safari IE9 and Opera) and the HTML5 doctype was created so that all browsers, even the really old and annoying ones, er, IE6 can use it. But just because old browsers recognize the doctype that doesn’t mean they can use all the new HTML5 tags and goodies. Fortunately, HTML5 is being built to make things easier and more cross browser friendly so in those older IE browsers that don’t like the new tags we can just simply add a Javascript shiv that will allow them to use the new elements:

<!--[if lt IE 9]>
<script src="http://html5shiv.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/html5.js"></script>
<![endif]-->

Some resources worth checking out:

2 – MOBILE, MOBILE, MOBILE

Call it a hunch, but I think mobile technology is becoming more popular these days. I know, that is a pretty crazy assumption and some of your are probably thinking — mobile is just a fad… right. Mobile devices are taking over the world. The adoption of mobile devices continues to grow very rapidly and this means that more and more users will be using their mobile browsers to view your web site or application. HTML5 is the most mobile ready tool for developing mobile sites and apps. With Adobe announcing the death of mobile Flash, you will now count on HTML5 to do your mobile web application development.

Mobile browsers have fully adopted HTML5 so creating mobile ready projects is as easy as designing and constructing for their smaller touch screen displays — hence the popularity of Responsive Design. There are some great meta tags that also allow you to optimize for mobile:

  • Viewport: allows you to define viewport widths and zoom settings
  • Full screen browsing: IOS specific values that allow Apple devices to display in full screen mode
  • Home Screen Icons: like favicons on desktop, these icons are used to add favorites to the home screen of an IOS and Android mobile device

For more info on how to mobilize your site via HTML5, check out “Mobifying” Your HTML5 Site.

Some resources worth checking out:

1 – IT’S THE FUTURE, GET WITH IT!

The number one reason why you should start using HTML5 today is this: it’s the future, start using it now so you don’t get left behind. HTML5 is not going anywhere and as more and more elements get adopted more and more companies will start to develop in HTML5. HTML5 is essentially just HTML, it’s not scary, it’s not anything you really need to figure out or relearn — if you’re developing XHTML strict right now you are already developing in HTML5 so why not take full advantage of it’s current capability?

You really don’t have any excuses not to adopt HTML5 and begin your new love affair with it. Truly, the only real reason I prefer to use HTML5 is just to write cleaner code, all the other benefits and fun features I haven’t even really jumped into yet, but that is the great thing about it, you can just start using it right now and not even change the way you design. So, start using it right now, whether you are just simplifying and making your markup more semantic OR you are gonna build some sick new mobile game that will take over the world — who knows, maybe you can start selling stuffed animal versions of your gaming characters too.

GREAT HTML5 RESOURCES

http://html5doctor.com
http://html5rocks.com
http://html5weekly.com
http://www.remysharp.com
http://www.script-tutorials.com

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Creating CSS Starbursts Design with CSS3 Transform

Working with the new CSS3 rotation property I got that I could create image free starbursts. All I needed was a series of nested block-level elements each rotated by a slightly different amount. The rotation would distribute the box corners around the circumference of the star.

About these CSS3 Starbursts:

A good thing is if you create your starbursts with CSS3 you can do so much more than with images. You can experiment with different numbers of points/corners, rounded borders, resize, text-shadows and animations also.

To see the animations you will need to use latest browsers like IE 9+, Firefox 4.0+, Safari 4.1+ and Chrome 3.0+.

css-starburst-design

No CSS Hacks

There are no CSS hacks required for these CSS3 starbursts. CSS is designed to be backwards compatible so any browser that cannot understand CSS3 will simply ignore these new rules without any error.

iPhone, iPod Touch, & iPad Compatible

The Safari browser is one of the most advanced when it comes to CSS3 because it uses the powerful Webkit rendering engine. This means all these animated starbursts will work fine on the iPhone, iPod Touch and the iPad.

SEO Friendly

Because the text in each starburst is actually real text it will be crawled and indexed by Google like everything else. It also means that people who are vision impaired can more easily read and understand your web page if they are using a screen reader.

No Images Required

All of the shapes, colours and shadows in the starbursts above are created using CSS3 rules. No images are used at all.

No JavaScript Required

The animations in these demos are made possible with the CSS3 transition rules. No JavaScript is used to create any effects.

Resizable Text Compatible

All the dimensions of the starbursts are set in em measurements. This means that you can increase the text size in your browser and the starburst will grow in size along with all other text. This is great news for web accessibility.

view demo

The HTML

<div class="price-container">
  <div class="price">
    <span class="label">Buy</span>
    <span class="number">$99.95</span>
    <span class="label">Now</span>
  </div>
</div>

I have <div> that, you guessed it, contains the price starburst. I’ll use this for the background of the starburst. The <div> is the container for the text inside (the price info.) That’s it for the markup. From here, I’ll be styling pseudo classes to create the multiple points. Also, I mentioned earlier that there were a few less points in the CSS version of this starburst. This markup doesn’t really have anything unnecessary in it.

The CSS

Now on to the fun part. Let me overview what I’m going to do, then I’ll show you the styles needed to achieve it. I’m going to style .price-container.price, and the :before and:after pseudo elements for each. Essentially, I’ve got six elements to work with. I created this background image to apply to each of the elements and I will rotate 15 degrees each:

image used for starburst

The CSS is a little bit longer. I’ve used the rotation rules in the CSS, one is for Firefox (prefixed with -moz-), one is for webkit i.e. Safari and Chrome (prefixed with -webkit-), one is for Internet Explorer (prefixed with -ms-), one is for Opera (prefixed with -o-), and the other is the standard rotation rule as it will be used once this rotation property becomes standard:

.price-container,
.price-container:before,
.price-container:after,
.price-container .price,
.price-container .price:before,
.price-container .price:after {
	height: 8.5em;
	width: 8.5em;
	background: #760B1F url(price-bg.png) top left no-repeat;
	background-size: 8.5em;
}

.price-container:before,
.price-container:after,
.price-container .price:before,
.price-container .price:after {
	content: "";
	position: absolute;
}

.price-container {
	margin: 100px auto; /* Centering for demo */
	position: relative; /* Context */
	top: 2.5em;
	left: 2.5em;
	-webkit-transform: rotate(-45deg);
	  -moz-transform: rotate(-45deg);
	   -ms-transform: rotate(-45deg);
	    -o-transform: rotate(-45deg);
	       transform: rotate(-45deg);
}

.price-container:before {
	top: 0;
	left: 0;
	-webkit-transform: rotate(-30deg);
	  -moz-transform: rotate(-30deg);
	   -ms-transform: rotate(-30deg);
	    -o-transform: rotate(-30deg);
	       transform: rotate(-30deg);
}

.price-container:after {
	top: 0;
	left: 0;
	-webkit-transform: rotate(-15deg);
	  -moz-transform: rotate(-15deg);
	   -ms-transform: rotate(-15deg);
	    -o-transform: rotate(-15deg);
	       transform: rotate(-15deg);
}

.price-container .price {
	padding: .5em 0em;
	height: 7.5em; /* height minus padding */
	position: absolute;
	bottom: 0;
	right: 0;
	-webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
	  -moz-transform: rotate(45deg);
	   -ms-transform: rotate(45deg);
	    -o-transform: rotate(45deg);
	       transform: rotate(45deg);
	z-index: 1; /* important so the text shows up */
}

.price-container .price:before {
	top: 0;
	left: 0;
	-webkit-transform: rotate(60deg);
	  -moz-transform: rotate(60deg);
	   -ms-transform: rotate(60deg);
	    -o-transform: rotate(60deg);
	       transform: rotate(60deg);
}

.price-container .price:after {
	top: 0;
	left: 0;
	-webkit-transform: rotate(75deg);
	  -moz-transform: rotate(75deg);
	   -ms-transform: rotate(75deg);
	    -o-transform: rotate(75deg);
	       transform: rotate(75deg);
}

A few things I’ll point out about the styles:

  • Notice the order of the rotation angles: This order is important because there is going to be text inside the inner-most element. Therefore, the last element (the one the text going in, in this case .price) has to be straight. Notice that .price-container is rotated -45 degrees and .price is rotated 45 degrees – back to 0.
  • The height and width: The height and width has to be set since we are dealing with background images here. I’ve set it in ems to adjust appropriately when the text size increases.
  • There’s a padding top and bottom on .price-container .price. That’s why the height is a little different than all the others.
  • Everything is positioned absolutely inside the first container. .price-container hasleft: 2.5em and top: 2.5em just to move the whole thing a little. When everything is rotated, the corners go of the page and out of the container a little.
  • z-index: There’s a z-index defined for .price-container .price. This is so the price information inside this div is visible.

Now all that’s left is styling the text.

.price-container .price span {
        position: relative;
	z-index: 100;
	display: block;
	text-align: center;
	color: #FE0;
	font: 1.8em/1.4em 'georgia',Sans-Serif;
	text-transform: uppercase;
}

.price-container .price span.number {
  font-weight: bold;
  font-size: 2.5em;
  line-height: .9em;
  color: #fff;
}

Some more CSS used in hover effect:

.price-container.one:hover {
	-webkit-transform: rotate(-20deg);
	-moz-transform: rotate(-20deg);
	-ms-transform: rotate(-20deg);
	-o-transform: rotate(-20deg);
	transform: rotate(-20deg);
}

Doing It Image-Free

Now, I have some extra stuff in here because the design called for this very subtle inner border. If you don’t like or need the inner border, just remove the bit about background image and background size and design will hold up fine.

Browser Support

This works as-is in IE 9+, Firefox 4.0+, Safari 4.1+ and Chrome 3.0+. IE 8 and below do not support background-size, and Chrome 1.0, Firefox 3.6 and Safari 3.0 will require some vendor prefixes. IE8 does support pseudo elements, however doesn’t support transform.

The fallback would be a colored square. Very likely not a huge problem.

auto-adjustable-dynamic-starburst-design-css3-html5

There You Have It

It’s a price star thing. Flexible enough to grow when you increase your font size. Made with some CSS. You can use this for highlighting prices, discounts etc.

That’s it!

I hope you enjoyed this article and if you have questions, comments, or suggestions, let me know! Thanks for reading.

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Image Sprites – How to merge multiple images, and how to split them

An Image Sprites is a single image which is merged with multiple images. The reason why Image Sprites are needed instead of inserting multiple images into a page is to SAVE network bandwidth as well as reduce the number of server requests. Since inserting many images into a page will take longer time to load the pages, merging images into a single will help reduce loading time. For these reasons, I would recommend to use “CSS Image Sprites” function instead of inserting multiple images. Unfortunately, most of designers/developers not support this function as default, but through this tutorial, you would be able to merge multiple images into a single image as well as manipulating CSS.

“Image Sprites” is strongly recommended for Web, because Web themes have many graphics as default. Therefore, reducing the number of images is necessary to let people as well as search engines visit your sites faster than before. Some times ago, I have already posted an example of a cartoon type animation with help of Image Sprites.

Let me give you an example for easier understandings. Here is lots of avatars I have to put into a page. Without Image Sprites, I have to insert 24 individual avatars into a page. It will generate 24 requests of your web server so that it will take a long time to load.

24 image files to load / 24 requests

Just 1 image file to load / 1 request

With using “Image Sprites”, Only one request and one loading time will be generated. Which one do you think better?

In addition, with the help of “Image Sprites”, you can make use of hover effect more easily. In this tutorial, I will describe how to use Image Sprites with hover effects (View Demo).

To get started (Preparation)

  1. You may need to prepare more than two same size images to be inserted into a page like the avatar image file above.
  2. For this tutorial, I will use these 6 images below as an example. All six buttons’ sizes are equal as 33×33.

3 left images will be used for normal links, and the rest of images will be used for hover effects.

This single image below will be used for “Image Sprites”.

Instruction

  1. Download .zip file or View Demo.
  2. Extract the compressed file onto your hard drive.
  3. Open “imagesprites.html” file using any TextEditor (Notepad/Dreamweaver).
  4. I will let you know some parts you need to replace so that you better modify some codes using text editor.
  5. This code is for this example so that your code will be different. You can refer to this code about how it works.
  6. Take a look at this part of the source code below:
.prev-button {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background:url('/images/controllers.png') 0 0
}
a:hover .prev-button {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background: url('/images/controllers.png') 0px -33px
}
.play-button  {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background:url('/images/controllers.png') -33px 0
}
a:hover .play-button  {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background: url('/images/controllers.png') -33px -33px
}
.next-button  {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background:url('/images/controllers.png') -66px 0
}
a:hover .next-button  {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background: url('/images/controllers.png') -66px -33px
}
image sprite
 As you can see, the first image’s position is “0 0” (.prev-button). The second image (.play-button) position is “-33px 0”. Because each width is set to 33px. Hence, the next image’s position should be “-66px 0”. On the other hand, for hover images, their Y position should be “-33px”, because each height is set to 33px.
  1. If you have set all, the next is to insert HTML codes for each image class like below:
<body style="background: transparent; margin: 0pt; ">
<div>
<a href="URL" target="_top"><img class="prev-button" src="/images/spacer.gif" /></a>
</div>

<div>
<a href="URL" target="_top"><img class="play-button" src="/images/spacer.gif" /></a>
</div>

<div>
<a href="URL" target="_top"><img class="next-button" src="/images/spacer.gif" /></a>
</div>
</body>
  1. If you don’t want an image to be linked, remove href= “URL” target= “_top” tag.
  2. Replace class names such as “prev-button”, “play-button”, and “next-button” to yours.
  3. Make sure the classes doesn’t have “.” at the very front.
  4. Modifying codes is done. You can apply this technique to other merged images.
  5. Make sure “spacer.gif” as well as your merged image file are also uploaded to the right place such as “/images/”.
  6. You are ready to check how “Image Sprites” works correctly. You will reduce the number of server requests as well as save network bandwidth with this CSS technique.

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar