Animated aquarium with pure CSS

Here is a pure CSS experimental work to create a aquarium. Image / javascript hasn’t been used for aquarium or it’s animation. I have used jQuery only for random air-bubbles. All these animation is created by Pure CSS. Some times ago, I had written a article about “Animated bubbles upwards continuously with pure CSS“. You can also use this trick for air-bubbles.
read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…

Animated aquarium with pure CSS

For Creating Aquarium’s water, sand, rocks and plants few lines of HTML required.

The HTML

<div class="bubbles"></div>

<div class="ground"></div>
<div class="rock_1"></div>
<div class="rock_2"></div>
<div class="rock_3"></div>
<div class="rock_4"></div>
<div class="rock_5"></div>
<div class="rock_6"></div>
<div class="rock_7"></div>

<div class="plant_1_wrap">
    <div class="plant_1"></div>
    <div class="plant_2"></div>
    <div class="plant_3"></div>
</div>
<div class="plant_2_wrap">
    <div class="plant_4"></div>
    <div class="plant_5"></div>
</div>

Now, its CSS turn. I had written about 1040 lines only in CSS for creating these elements.
read more @ http://www.css-jquery-design.com/…read-more-button

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Cool inset Text Effect with CSS3 Text-Shadow

So, I have seen a few tutorials online about using text-shadow to create a basic inset text effect, but they are all lacking the real design aspect that makes the type look like it is actually INSET. That aspect is the inner shadow.

Introduction

I played around with trying to hack box-shadow into background-image in the same way that you can add linear gradients to text, but to no avail.

Well, in any case, I finally was able to get something to work, and yes, it is pretty killer.


insetText

That’s it right there. But, let’s take a look at how and why this works.

First let’s start with defining our class and setting our font. We have styled our div and our body and now we want this text to look like it is stamped into to page.

The CSS

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
}

The next step we want to take is to set the background-color of the text to the color that we want the inset to be. So…

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
}

Next, we are going to use the background-clip CSS3 property to create a clipping mask using the text to mask the background. Now if you are a designer, you probably already know how a clipping mask works. The color black is transparent to the background and the color white is opaque. Thus, the image behind the mask will show through on only the black parts and the white parts will ‘clip’ it. Remember that, because it’s important.

Remember, CSS3 is not standard yet and may not be supported in older browsers. For now, it’s best to use the standard AND browser specific properties for any CSS3, so…

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
	-moz-background-clip: text;
	background-clip: text;
}

Now, I know. It doesn’t look like that did anything, whatsoever. We are back where we started, right? Wrong, in truth, the background color has been clipped behind the text, so it only shows through where the text is. The problem is that the browser default CSS is to make text black. So, now we simply use color to make the text transparent.

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
	-moz-background-clip: text;
	background-clip: text;
        color: transparent;
}

Now we’re getting somewhere. We have taken transparent text and used it to clip it’s grey background. Here is where the magic happens. We will use the text-shadow property with rgba colors. Since the text is transparent, the entire shadow, even what is normally hidden by the text in front of it, will show. If we offset the shadow vertically, it will appear as if it is on the inside of the text. And if we blur the edges, it should actually appear like an inset shadow, since the darker clipped background fading into the white shadow right? And the shadow that falls outside of the clipping mask should appear to glow slightly, since that it’s closer in color to the contrasting background! So…

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
	-moz-background-clip: text;
	background-clip: text;
        color: transparent;
        text-shadow: rgba(255,255,255,1.0) 0px 3px 3px;
}

Yeah, that looks pretty good, right? I just don’t like how the inside of the text in now white. It looks kind of unnatural, and it really takes away from the outer glow that gives it the inset look. So let’s revise our shadow color by dropping it’s opacity or ‘a’ value to 0.5. Like so…

.insetText {
        font-family: Lucida Grande;
        background-color: #666666;
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
	-moz-background-clip: text;
	background-clip: text;
        color: transparent;
        text-shadow: rgba(255,255,255,0.5) 0px 3px 3px;
}

Perfect! Now we have a completely CSS based inset text effect! We can now add this class to any text element on our websites, without having to open Photoshop or Illustrator, create the document, design the effect, save the image, upload the image, and then place the image in our markup where it will slow down our load time. You would add this to your markup like so…

<h1>This is inset text</h1>

This solution is great for headings. The smaller you make your text the smaller you will need to make your text-shadow.

NOTE: This method is currently only supported by Webkit browser like Google Chrome and Apple Safari.

Thanks for reading, and I hope this helped!

view demo

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

CSS3 3D effect, Shine text with css3 keyframe animation, Scrolling Page Background with jQuery – Happy New Year

On the occasion of New Year 2013, I thought to wish this festival by creating a nice webpage greeting. So, today I created this greeting card using 3D  and shining text effect with the help of CSS3, and scrolling background with JavaScript. I hope you all will enjoy this holiday as well as my web-card too :) .

Introduction

Greeting, today we are going to make a scrolling background effect. This script will move the background of any html tag, either vertically or horizontally. I used this script in one of my greeting card too which has a blue sky with clouds and it makes the whole website came alive. I think that’s pretty impressive. In this card you will find texts with different CSS effects like: 3D emboss, continuous spotlight shine effect, text shadow etc.

3d-shine-text-css3-scrolling-background-happy-new-year

The CSS

I have Used multiple text-shadows to create 3D text on any HTML element. No extra HTML, no extra headaches, just awesomesauce.
Works in the latest builds of Safari, Chrome, Firefox, and Opera.

h1 {
  margin:1.2em auto;
  font: bold 100px/1 "Helvetica Neue", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
  color: #fff;
  text-shadow: 0 1px 0 #cccccc, 0 2px 0 #c9c9c9, 0 3px 0 #bbbbbb, 0 4px 0 #b9b9b9, 0 5px 0 #aaaaaa, 0 6px 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1), 0 0 5px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.1), 0 1px 3px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3), 0 3px 5px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 5px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25), 0 10px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 20px 20px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.15);
  -webkit-transition: .2s all linear;
}

Text shine Effect created with WebKit-specific CSS3 properties. You’ll need Safari or Chrome to enjoy key-frame animation.

p.shine{
    font-size: 3em;
    margin: 0 auto; padding:0;
    width: 95%;
}
.shine{
    background: #222 -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right top, from(#ccc), to(#fff), color-stop(1, #f0f)) 0 0 no-repeat;
    background-size: 400px; -webkit-background-size: 400px; 
    -moz-background-size: 400px; -o-background-size: 400px;    
    color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.7);	
    background-clip: text; -webkit-background-clip: text; 
        -moz-background-clip: text; -o-background-clip: text;	
	-webkit-animation: shine 2s infinite;
	-moz-animation: shine 2s infinite;
	-o-animation: shine 2s infinite;
	-ms-animation: shine 2s infinite;
	animation: shine 2s infinite; 
}

@-webkit-keyframes shine{
    0%{background-position: top left;}
    100%{background-position: top right;}
}
@-moz-keyframes shine{
    0%{background-position: top left;}
    100%{background-position: top right;}
}
@-o-keyframes shine{
    0%{background-position: top left;}
    100%{background-position: top right;}
}
@keyframes shine{
    0%{background-position: top left;}
    100%{background-position: top right;}
}

For page background I used cloud in png format.

body{background:url(bg_clouds.png) 0 0}

The HTML

<h1>Happy New Year 2013</h1>
<p class="shine">The New Year is the time of unfolding horizons and the realization of dreams, may you rediscover new strength and garner faith with you, and be able to rejoice in the simple pleasures that life has to offer and put a brave front for all the challenges that may come your way.<br>
Wishing you a lovely New Year..</p>

The JavaScript – jQuery

We have to add jquery library in body first, after that we animate our page background with css background-position properties. I always prefer to use JavaScript files before close of body tag.

<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">var scrollSpeed = 70; 
    var current = 0;
    function bgscroll(){
        current -= 1;   
        // move the background with backgrond-position css properties
        $('body').css("backgroundPosition", 1 ? current+"px 0" : "0 " + current+"px");   
    }
     setInterval(bgscroll, scrollSpeed);   </script>

view demo

Happy New Year!

I hope you like the result and don’t hesitate to share your thoughts about it. Thanks for reading!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

CSS3 Buttons with Cool Effects – Pure CSS

Nowadays, using subtle patterns is kinda cool so I thought why not using them also on buttons? The idea was to create some nice CSS3 patterned buttons and in this article you’ll see what I’ve been working on lately.

css3-patterned-buttons

view demo

I wrote before about CSS3 buttons, so you may want to check also these articles:

CSS3 patterned buttons features

  • Easy-to-use.
  • Contain the transitions on gradients hack.
  • As you may have expected, no images used here. Instead, an base64 string is used to create the patterned effect.
  • Stilish pressed behavior when grouped.

Buttons

Basically, to create a button, the only thing you have to do is this:

<a href="" class="button">Button</a>

or

<button class="button">Button</button>

You could also use something like <input type="submit"> but for best cross-browser rendering, just stick to the above.

THE CSS

.button{
  display: inline-block;
  *display: inline;
  zoom: 1;
  padding: 6px 20px;
  margin: 0;
  cursor: pointer;
  border: 1px solid #bbb;
  overflow: visible;
  font: bold 13px arial, helvetica, sans-serif;
  text-decoration: none;
  white-space: nowrap;
  color: #555;
  background-color: #ddd;
  background-image: linear-gradient(top, rgba(255,255,255,1),
                                         rgba(255,255,255,0)),
                    url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGg[...]QmCC); 
  transition: background-color .2s ease-out;
  background-clip: padding-box; /* Fix bleeding */
  border-radius: 3px;
  box-shadow: 0 1px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, .3),
              0 2px 2px -1px rgba(0, 0, 0, .5),
              0 1px 0 rgba(255, 255, 255, .3) inset;
  text-shadow: 0 1px 0 rgba(255,255,255, .9);  
}

.button:hover{
  background-color: #eee;
  color: #555;
}

.button:active{
  background: #e9e9e9;
  position: relative;
  top: 1px;
  text-shadow: none;
  box-shadow: 0 1px 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, .3) inset;
}

Different buttons sizes

If you want to make a more prominent or a less prominent call-to-action button, you have options:

css3-patterned-buttons

<button class="small button">Button</button>

or

<button class="large button">Button</button>

THE CSS

/* Smaller buttons styles */

.button.small{
  padding: 4px 12px;
}

/* Larger buttons styles */

.button.large{
  padding: 12px 30px;
  text-transform: uppercase;
}

.button.large:active{
  top: 2px;
}

Various buttons colors

You’ll need custom colors for successful actions or negative ones as delete:

css3-patterned-buttons

<button class="button">Button</button>
<button class="color red button">Button</button>
<button class="color green button">Button</button>
<button class="color blue button">Button</button>

THE CSS

.button.color{
  color: #fff;
  text-shadow: 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,.2);
  background-image: linear-gradient(top, rgba(255,255,255,.3), 
  					 rgba(255,255,255,0)),
                    url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGg[...]QmCC);
}

/* */

.button.green{
  background-color: #57a957;
  border-color: #57a957;
}

.button.green:hover{
  background-color: #62c462;
}

.button.green:active{
  background: #57a957;
}

/* */

.button.red{
  background-color: #c43c35;
  border-color: #c43c35;
}

.button.red:hover{
  background-color: #ee5f5b;
}

.button.red:active{
  background: #c43c35;
}

/* */

.button.blue{
  background-color: #269CE9;
  border-color: #269CE9;
}

.button.blue:hover{
  background-color: #70B9E8;
}

.button.blue:active{
  background: #269CE9;
}

Disabled states

In case you’re using buttons or inputs, in some cases you’ll need them to be disabled until a certain task is triggered:

css3-patterned-buttons

<button class="button" disabled>Button</button>
<button class="color red button" disabled>Button</button>
<button class="color green button" disabled>Button</button>
<button class="color blue button" disabled>Button</button>

THE CSS

.button[disabled], .button[disabled]:hover, .button[disabled]:active{
  border-color: #eaeaea;
  background: #fafafa;
  cursor: default;
  position: static;
  color: #999;
  /* Usually, !important should be avoided but here it's really needed :) */
  box-shadow: none !important;
  text-shadow: none !important;
}

.green[disabled], .green[disabled]:hover, .green[disabled]:active{
  border-color: #57A957;
  background: #57A957;
  color: #D2FFD2;
}

.red[disabled], .red[disabled]:hover, .red[disabled]:active{
  border-color: #C43C35;
  background: #C43C35;
  color: #FFD3D3;
}

.blue[disabled], .blue[disabled]:hover, .blue[disabled]:active{
  border-color: #269CE9;
  background: #269CE9;
  color: #93D5FF;
}

Grouped buttons

There will be cases when you’ll need to group similar call-to-action buttons:

css3-patterned-buttons

<ul class="button-group">
	<li><button class="button">Button</button></li>
	<li><button class="button">Button</button></li>
	<li><button class="button">Button</button></li>
	<li><button class="button">Button</button></li>
</ul>

THE CSS

.button-group,
.button-group li{
  display: inline-block;
  *display: inline;
  zoom: 1;
}

.button-group{
  font-size: 0; /* Inline block elements gap - fix */
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  background: rgba(0, 0, 0, .04);
  border-bottom: 1px solid rgba(0, 0, 0, .07);
  padding: 7px;
  border-radius: 7px; 
}

.button-group li{
  margin-right: -1px; /* Overlap each right button border */
}

.button-group .button{
  font-size: 13px; /* Set the font size, different from inherited 0 */
  border-radius: 0; 
}

.button-group .button:active{
  box-shadow: 0 0 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, .2) inset,
              5px 0 5px -3px rgba(0, 0, 0, .2) inset,
              -5px 0 5px -3px rgba(0, 0, 0, .2) inset;   
}

.button-group li:first-child .button{
  border-radius: 3px 0 0 3px;
}

.button-group li:first-child .button:active{
  box-shadow: 0 0 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, .2) inset,
              -5px 0 5px -3px rgba(0, 0, 0, .2) inset;
}

.button-group li:last-child .button{
  border-radius: 0 3px 3px 0;
}

.button-group li:last-child .button:active{
  box-shadow: 0 0 1px rgba(0, 0, 0, .2) inset,
              5px 0 5px -3px rgba(0, 0, 0, .2) inset;
}

Browser compatibility

CSS3 patterned buttons works in all major browsers. But of course CSS3 features used here do not work in oder browsers like IE8 and below.

view demo

This is it!

There are so many CSS3 buttons in the wild and I know it. Yet I’m confident that my CSS3 patterned buttons might inspire you and I hope you’ll find it useful for your future projects.

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Rotating Words With CSS Animations – CSS3 Keyframes Animation Example

In today’s tutorial we’ll create another typography effect. The idea is to have some kind of sentence and to rotate a part of it. We’ll be “exchanging” certain words of that sentence using CSS animations.
Please note: the result of this tutorial will only work as intended in browsers that support CSS animations.
So let’s start!

In the following, we’ll be going through demo.

rotating-words-css-animations

THE HTML

We’ll have a main wrapper with a h2 heading that contains first-level spans and two divisions for the rotating words:

<section class="rw-wrapper">
	<h2 class="rw-sentence">
		<span>Real poetry is like</span>
		<br />
		<span>creating beautiful butterflies</span>
		<br />
		<span>with a silent touch of</span>
		<div class="rw-words rw-words-1">
			<span>spice</span>
			<span>colors</span>
			<span>happiness</span>
			<span>wonder</span>
			<span>sugar</span>
			<span>happiness</span>
		</div>
	</h2>
</section>

Now, ignoring the garbage placeholder text, we want each span of the rw-word to appear at a time. For that we’ll be using CSS animations. We’ll create one animation for each division and each span will run it, just with different delays.
So, let’s look at the CSS.

THE CSS3

First, we will style the main wrapper and center it on the page:

.rw-wrapper{
	width: 80%;
	position: relative;
	margin: 110px auto 0 auto;
	font-family: 'Bree Serif';
	padding: 10px;
	height: 400px;
	overflow: hidden;
}

We’ll add some text shadow to all the elements in the heading:

.rw-sentence{
	margin: 0;
	text-align: left;
	text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px rgba(255,255,255,0.8);
}

And add some specific text styling to the spans:

.rw-sentence span{
	color: #444;
	white-space: nowrap;
	font-size: 200%;
	font-weight: normal;
}

The divisions will be displayed as inline elements, that will allow us to “insert” them into the sentence without breaking the flow:

.rw-words{
	display: inline;
	text-indent: 10px;
}

Each span inside of a rw-words div will be positioned absolutely and we’ll hide any overflow:

.rw-words span{
	position: absolute;
	opacity: 0;
	overflow: hidden;
	color: #888;
	-webkit-transform-origin: 10% 75%;
	-moz-transform-origin: 10% 75%;
	-ms-transform-origin: 10% 75%;
	-o-transform-origin: 10% 75%;
	transform-origin: 10% 75%;
}

Now, we’ll run two animations. As mentioned previously, we’ll run the same animation for all the spans in one div, just with different delays:

.rw-words-1 span{
	animation: rotateWord 16s linear infinite 0s;
}
.rw-words-2 span{
    animation: rotateWordsSecond 18s linear infinite 0s;
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(2) {
	animation-delay: 3s; 
	color: #6b889d;
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(3) {
	animation-delay: 6s; 
	color: #6b739d;	
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(4) {
	animation-delay: 9s; 
	color: #7a6b9d;
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(5) {
	animation-delay: 12s; 
	color: #8d6b9d;
}
.rw-words span:nth-child(6) {
	animation-delay: 15s; 
	color: #9b6b9d;
}

Our animations will run one cycle, meaning that each span will be shown once for three seconds, hence the delay value. The whole animation will run 6 (number of images) * 3 (appearance time) = 18 seconds.
We will need to set the right percentage for the opacity value (or whatever makes the span appear). Dividing 6 by 18 gives us 0.333… which would be 33% for our keyframe step. Everything that we want to happen to the span needs to happen before that. So, after tweaking and seeing what fits best, we come up with the following animation (Fade in and “fall”) for the first words:

@keyframes rotateWord {
    0% { opacity: 0; }
    5% { opacity: 1; }
    17% { opacity: 1; transform: rotate(0deg); }
	19% { opacity: 1; transform: rotate(98deg); }
	21% { opacity: 1; transform: rotate(86deg); }
	23% { opacity: 1; transform: translateY(85px) rotate(83deg); }
	25% { opacity: 0; transform: translateY(170px) rotate(80deg); }
	80% { opacity: 0; }
    100% { opacity: 0; }
}

We’ll fade in the span and we’ll also animate its height.
The animation for the words in the second div will fade in and animate their width. We added a bit to the keyframe step percentages here, because we want these words to appear just a tiny bit later than the ones of the first word:

@keyframes rotateWordsSecond {
    0% { opacity: 1; animation-timing-function: ease-in; width: 0px; }
    10% { opacity: 0.3; width: 0px; }
    20% { opacity: 1; width: 100%; }
    27% { opacity: 0; width: 100%; }
    100% { opacity: 0; }
}

css3-animations-rotating-words

And that’s it folks! There are many possibilities for the animations, you can check out the demo and see what can be applied!
I hope you enjoyed this tutorial and find it inspiring!
view demo

 

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Animated 3D Bouncing Ball with CSS3, Html5

Hi guys! Today we are going to see another great example of how to use the power of CSS3. We will start by creating a very cool and realistic 3D ball with pure CSS3 properties, and add a little CSS3 animations for giving the ball a “bouncing” effect.

Please note: the result of this tutorial will only work as intended in browsers that support the respective CSS properties (gradient, shadow, border-radius, keyframe animation).css-3d-bouncing-ball

THE HTML

Let’s start with some very basic HTML:

<div id="ballWrapper">
     <div id="ball"></div>
     <div id="ballShadow"></div>
</div>

What we have here are 3 simple DIV elements. “#ballWrapper” is the main DIV which wraps the ball. This DIV will determine the ball’s position and height on the screen. Next, we have the “#ball” element which is the ball markup, and finally there is the “#ballShadow” which holds the ball’s shadow separately from the ball itself.

THE CSS

First, we’ll want to set a basic width and height to our ‘#ballWrapper’ DIV. It will help us position it to the center of the screen:

#ballWrapper {
    width: 140px;
    height: 300px;
    position: fixed;
    left: 50%;
    top: 50%;
    margin: -150px 0 0 -70px;
}

Note that I gave the DIV both top and left position properties of  ‘50%’, and a negative top and left margin which is calculated to be exactly half of the original height and width of the DIV. That way we can center the ball on the screen.

Next in line, let’s give our ball some styles (grow up, it’s not that funny… :])

#ball {
    width: 140px;
    height: 140px;
    border-radius: 70px;
    background: linear-gradient(top,  rgba(187,187,187,1) 0%,rgba(119,119,119,1) 99%);
    box-shadow: inset 0 -5px 15px rgba(255,255,255,0.4), 
                inset -2px -1px 40px rgba(0,0,0,0.4), 
                0 0 1px #000;   
}

We are giving the ball equal width and height and a ‘border-radius‘ property with a value of  ’70px’ (which is half of the original width and height we’ve set) so it will be a ball and not an oval shape.

Another thing you’ll notice is the background. I gave the ball’s element a linear background and 3 different box shadow levels so it would get the 3D effect. The first box shadow level is for the dark shadowing at the bottom of the ball (see image). Then, we have the second level that is responsible for the blurry glow – again, at the bottom of the ball. Finally the third level is a hardly noticeable blurry shadow behind the contours of the ball.

If you take a look at the ball you’ll notice that there is another small oval shape on top of the ball that gives it a reflection effect. Here is how I created it:

#ball::after {
    content: "";
    width: 80px; 
    height: 40px; 
    position: absolute;
    left: 30px;
    top: 10px;  
    background: linear-gradient(top,  rgba(232,232,232,1) 0%,rgba(232,232,232,1) 1%,rgba(255,255,255,0) 100%);
    border-radius: 40px / 20px; 
}

I used the CSS pseudo element ::after and gave it a linear gradient with an opacity. In addition, I’ve set the border radius to  ’40px / 20px’ so it has an oval shape.
Next, let’s handle the ball’s shadow:

#ballShadow {
    width: 60px;
    height: 75px;
    position: absolute;
    z-index: 0;
    bottom: 0;
    left: 50%;
    margin-left: -30px;
    background: rgba(20, 20, 20, .1);
    box-shadow: 0px 0 20px 35px rgba(20,20,20,.1);
    border-radius: 30px / 40px; 
}

view demo

Again, I used the same properties for centering the shadow, but this time I pinned it to the bottom of ‘#ballWrapper’. I also added a semi-transparent background to it, a fitting box shadow and a border radius.

THE BOUNCING ANIMATION

Now let’s take a look at the fun stuff…

I’ll start by adding the animation property to our ball:

#ball {
    animation: jump 1s infinite;
}

All I did was to define the animation’s name (jump), the animation’s duration (1 second) and how many times the animation will happen – in our case we use ‘infinite’ which means that it will run forever.
The animation itself:

@keyframes jump {
    0% {
        top: 0;
    }
    50% {
        top: 140px;
        height: 140px;
    }
    55% {
        top: 160px; 
        height: 120px; 
        border-radius: 70px / 60px;
    }
    65% {
        top: 120px; 
        height: 140px; 
        border-radius: 70px;
    }
    95% {
        top: 0;
    }
    100% {
        top: 0;
    }
}

So, basically what I’m doing here is to play with the ‘top’ position property of the ball.  Starting from 0, through 160 and back to 0. You’ll notice that in the middle of the animation I’m also playing with the ‘border-radius’ property – that way I handle the “impact” of the ball on the ground.

And now the ball’s shadow; first let’s add the shadow’s relevant animation property:

#ballShadow {
    animation: shrink 1s infinite;
}

I used the same values that I used with the ball, only with a different keyframes animation called shrink which looks as follows:

@-keyframes shrink {
    0% {
        bottom: 0;
        margin-left: -30px;
        width: 60px;
        height: 75px;
        background: rgba(20, 20, 20, .1);
        box-shadow: 0px 0 20px 35px rgba(20,20,20,.1);
        border-radius: 30px / 40px;
    }
    50% {
        bottom: 30px;
        margin-left: -10px;
        width: 20px;
        height: 5px;
        background: rgba(20, 20, 20, .3);
        box-shadow: 0px 0 20px 35px rgba(20,20,20,.3);
        border-radius: 20px / 20px;
    }
    100% {
        bottom: 0;
        margin-left: -30px;
        width: 60px;
        height: 75px;
        background: rgba(20, 20, 20, .1);
        box-shadow: 0px 0 20px 35px rgba(20,20,20,.1);
        border-radius: 30px / 40px;
    }
}

In the shadow’s animation I played with different properties then in the ball’s animation. In order to give it all a realistic effect when it comes to the ball’s distance from the floor, I needed to animate the shadow width, height and opacity. While the ball is close to the floor, the shadow needs to be darker and smaller. When the ball jumps up, the shadow should be lighter and bigger.

Last, but not least, let’s add the “click effect” to the ball which makes it appear as if it moves away from us when we click and hold. To achieve this effect, all we have to use is the ‘:active’ pseudo-class, add a transition and play with the CSS3 transform ‘scale’ property like this:

#ballWrapper {
    transform: scale(1);
    transition: all 5s linear 0s;
}

#ballWrapper:active {
    transform: scale(0);
}

The transition from a transform value of scale(1) to scale(0) will make it look as if the element is moving away from you.

view demo

That’s it!

I hope you enjoyed this article and if you have questions, comments, or suggestions, let me know! Thanks for reading.

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Random 3D Explosions, 3D clouds – Effects with CSS 3D and jQuery

Introduction

This tutorial will try to guide you through the steps to create a 3D-like, explosions in sky or billboard-based clouds. There are a few advanced topics, mainly how 3D transformations via CSS properties work. If you want to find more information, this is a nice place to begin.

If you’re in a hurry, just check the final result.

css-3d-explosive-clouds

The tutorial is divided into sections, each with a different step to understand and follow the process, with HTML, CSS and Javascript blocks. Each step is based on the previous one, and has a link to test the code. The code in the tutorial is a simplified version of the demos, but the main differences are documented on every section.

HTML

First, we need two div elements: viewport and world. All the rest of the elements will be dynamically created.

Viewport covers the whole screen and acts as the camera plane. Since in CSS 3D Transforms there is no camera per se, think of it as a static sheet of glass through which you see a world that changes orientation relative to you. We’ll position all our world objects (or scene) inside it, and that’s what will be transformed around.

World is a div that we are going to use to anchor all our 3D elements. Transforming (rotating, translating or scaling) world will transform all our elements. For brevity and from here on, I’m using non-prefixed CSS properties. Use the vendor prefix (-webkit, -moz, -o, -ms, etc.) where appropriate.

This is all the markup we’ll need:

<div id="viewport">
    <div id="world"></div>
</div>

CSS

These next are our two CSS definitions. It’s very important to center the div that contains our scene (world in our case) in the viewport, or the scene will be rendered with an offset! Remember that you are still rotating an element that is positioned inside the document, exactly like any other 2D element.

#viewport {
	-webkit-perspective: 1000; -moz-perspective: 1000; -o-perspective: 1000; 
	position: absolute; 
	left: 0; 
	top: 0; 
	right: 0; 
	bottom: 0; 
	overflow: hidden;
	background-image: linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -o-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -webkit-gradient(
			linear,
			left bottom,
			left top,
			color-stop(0.28, rgb(69,132,180)),
			color-stop(0.64, rgb(31,71,120))
	);
}

#world {
	position: absolute; 
	left: 50%; 
	top: 50%; 
	margin-left: -256px; 
	margin-top: -256px; 
	height: 512px; 
	width: 512px; 
	-webkit-transform-style: preserve-3d; 
	-moz-transform-style: preserve-3d; 
	-o-transform-style: preserve-3d; 
	pointer-events: none;
}

CSS For Adding Clouds Base

Now we start adding real 3D content. We add some new div which are positioned in the space, relatively to world. It’s esentially adding several absolute-positioned div as children of world, but using translate in 3 dimensions instead of left and top. They are centered in the middle of world by default. The width and height don’t really matter, since these new elements are containers for the actual cloud layers. For commodity, it’s better to center them (by setting margin-left and margin-top to negative half of width and height).

.cloudBase {
		position: absolute; 
		left: 256px; 
		top: 256px; 
		width: 20px; 
		height: 20px; 
		margin-left: -10px; 
		margin-top: -10px
	}

CSS for Clouds Layer

Now things start getting interesting. We add several absolute-positioned .cloudLayer div elements to each .cloudBase. These will hold our cloud textures.

.cloudLayer {
		position: absolute; 
		left: 50%; 
		top: 50%; 
		width: 256px; 
		height: 256px; 
		margin-left: -128px; 
		margin-top: -128px; 
		-webkit-transition: opacity .5s ease-out; 
		-moz-transition: opacity .5s ease-out; 
		-o-transition: opacity .5s ease-out;
	}

jQuery (JavaScript)

We add generate() and createCloud() functions to populate world. Note that random_{var} are not real variables but placeholder names for the real code, which should return a random number between the specified range.

var layers = [],
	objects = [],
	textures = [],

	world = document.getElementById( 'world' ),
	viewport = document.getElementById( 'viewport' ),

	d = 0,
	p = 400,
	worldXAngle = 0,
	worldYAngle = 0,
	computedWeights = [];

	viewport.style.webkitPerspective = p;
	viewport.style.MozPerspective = p;
	viewport.style.oPerspective = p;
	textures = [
		{ name: 'white cloud', 	file: 'cloud.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'dark cloud', 	file: 'darkCloud.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'smoke cloud', 	file: 'smoke.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'explosion', 	file: 'explosion.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'explosion 2', 	file: 'explosion2.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'box', 		file: 'box.png'		, opacity: 1, weight: 0 }
	];

	function setTextureUsage( id, mode ) {
		var modes = [ 'None', 'Few', 'Normal', 'Lot' ];
		var weights = { 'None': 0, 'Few': .3, 'Normal': .7, 'Lot': 1 };
		for( var j = 0; j < modes.length; j++ ) {
			var el = document.getElementById( 'btn' + modes[ j ] + id );
			el.className = el.className.replace( ' active', '' );
			if( modes[ j ] == mode ) {
				el.className += ' active';
				textures[ id ].weight = weights[ mode ];
			}
		}
	}
	setTextureUsage( 0, 'Few' );
	setTextureUsage( 1, 'Few' );
	setTextureUsage( 2, 'Normal' );
	setTextureUsage( 3, 'Lot' );
	setTextureUsage( 4, 'Lot' );

	generate();

	function createCloud() {

		var div = document.createElement( 'div'  );
		div.className = 'cloudBase';
		var x = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 );
		var y = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 );
		var z = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 );
		var t = 'translateX( ' + x + 'px ) translateY( ' + y + 'px ) translateZ( ' + z + 'px )';
		div.style.webkitTransform = t;
		div.style.MozTransform = t;
		div.style.oTransform = t;
		world.appendChild( div );

		for( var j = 0; j < 5 + Math.round( Math.random() * 10 ); j++ ) {
			var cloud = document.createElement( 'img' );
			cloud.style.opacity = 0;
			var r = Math.random();
			var src = 'troll.png';
			for( var k = 0; k < computedWeights.length; k++ ) { 
				if( r >= computedWeights[ k ].min && r <= computedWeights[ k ].max ) { 					
( function( img ) { img.addEventListener( 'load', function() {
 						img.style.opacity = .8;
					} ) } )( cloud );
 					src = computedWeights[ k ].src; 
}} 
cloud.setAttribute( 'src', src ); 
cloud.className = 'cloudLayer'; 		 			
var x = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 ); 
var y = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 ); 
var z = 100 - ( Math.random() * 200 ); 
var a = Math.random() * 360; 
var s = .25 + Math.random(); 
x *= .2; y *= .2; 
cloud.data = {x: x, y: y, z: z, a: a, s: s, speed: .1 * Math.random()}; 
var t = 'translateX( ' + x + 'px ) translateY( ' + y + 'px ) translateZ( ' + z + 'px ) rotateZ( ' + a + 'deg ) scale( ' + s + ' )'; 
cloud.style.webkitTransform = t; 
cloud.style.MozTransform = t; 			
cloud.style.oTransform = t; 			
div.appendChild( cloud ); 			
layers.push( cloud ); 		} 		 		
return div; 	 	
function generate() { 		
objects = []; 		
if ( world.hasChildNodes() ) { 			
while ( world.childNodes.length >= 1 ) {
				world.removeChild( world.firstChild );       
			} 
		}
		computedWeights = [];
		var total = 0;
		for( var j = 0; j < textures.length; j++ ) { 			
if( textures[ j ].weight > 0 ) {
				total += textures[ j ].weight;
			}
		}
		var accum = 0;
		for( var j = 0; j < textures.length; j++ ) { 			
if( textures[ j ].weight > 0 ) {
				var w = textures[ j ].weight / total;
				computedWeights.push( {
					src: textures[ j ].file,
					min: accum,
					max: accum + w
				} );
				accum += w;
			}
		}
		for( var j = 0; j < 5; j++ ) {
			objects.push( createCloud() );
		}
	}

Result

For the final effect, we fill cloudLayer div for an img with a cloud texture. The textures should be PNG with alpha channel to get the effect right.

css-3d-explosive-clouds

Conclusion

Of course, you can use any texture or set of textures you want: smoke puffs, plasma clouds, green leaves, flying toasters… Just change the background-image that a specific kind of cloud layer uses. Mixing different textures in different proportions gives interesting results.

Adding elements in random order is fine, but you can also create ordered structures, like trees, duck-shaped clouds or complex explosions. Try following a 3D curve and create solid trails of clouds. Create a multiplayer game to guess the shape of a 3D cloud. The possibilities are endless!

I hope it’s been an interesting tutorial and not too hard to follow.

view demo

I hope you like the result and don’t hesitate to share your thoughts about it. Thanks for reading!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar