Simple and Easy Tooltip Using jQuery & CSS3

I love jQuery and the way it makes web-designer’s/developer’s life easier.  Although it took all a while to accept it. I still prefer to write my own stuff, I can’t deny its advantages.   Today I will show you a “Tool-Tip” examples of using the same very, very simple script.

Features and Principle

Note: Tooltip Plugin is Less than 1Kb in size.
What this script does is adds an element to the body when you roll over a certain object. That element’s appearance is predefined with css (positioned absolute and styled) so all we need to do is fill the element with content, calculate mouse position and make it move accordingly. When cursor is moved over he object, element moves with it and when cursor roll out, the element is deleted.

Here is a  example where you can see this script in action.

The Simplest jQuery Tooltip Ever

The script takes a title attribute of an A tag and place it inside the popup element.

The Html

<a href="https://dhirajkumarsingh.wordpress.com" class="tooltip" title="Latest Techonology Updates in Web Technology">Roll over for tooltip</a>

The CSS

#tooltip{
	position:absolute; 
        color:#fff; 
        display:none;
	border:1px solid #333; 
        border-radius:4px;
	background-color:#222; background:rgba(2,2,2,.8);
	padding:2px 5px; 
        box-shadow:2px 2px 5px 0 rgba(2,2,2,.8);
}

jQuery – The javascript

First of all, we have to add jQuery library.
after adding jQuery library we have to add this tooltip plugin.
In this plugin you will got :

this.tooltip = function(){	
	/* CONFIG */		
		xOffset = 10;
		yOffset = 20;		
		// these 2 variable determine popup's distance from the cursor
		// you might want to adjust to get the right result		
	/* END CONFIG */		
	$("a.tooltip").hover(function(e){											  
		this.t = this.title;
		this.title = "";								  
		$("body").append("

“+ this.t +”

"); 
                $("#tooltip") .css("top",(e.pageY - xOffset) + "px") 
                              .css("left",(e.pageX + yOffset) + "px") 
                              .fadeIn("fast"); 
         }, function(){ this.title = this.t; 
                  $("#tooltip").remove(); 
         }); 
         $("a.tooltip").mousemove(function(e){ 
                $("#tooltip") .css("top",(e.pageY - xOffset) + "px") 
               .css("left",(e.pageX + yOffset) + "px"); 
}); 
}; 
// starting the script on page load 
$(document).ready(function(){ 
              tooltip()
});

view demo

Your turn

I hope you enjoyed this article and the techniques I used. Please share your comments and questions below!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Cool Typography Effects With CSS3 and jQuery

Today we will create a set of nice typography effects for big headlines using CSS3 and jQuery. There are many things we can do with CSS3 animations and transitions and we’ll explore some of the possibilities.

Today we will create a set of nice typography effects for big headlines using CSS3 and jQuery. There are many things we can do with CSS3 animations and transitions and we’ll explore some of the possibilites.

We’ll be using jquery.DG_lettering.js in order to style single letters of the words we’ll be having in our big headlines.

typography-effects-with-css-jquery

THE HTML

The structure will simply be an h2 element with an anchor inside. We’ll wrap the headline in a container:

<div id="letter-container" class="letter-container">
    <h2><a href="#">Sun</a></h2>
</div>

Then we’ll call the jquery.DG_lettering.js plugin, so that every letter gets wrapped in a span.

This example looks crazy: we’ll create a text shadow that “elevates” the letters. We’ll also create a pseudo element which has a superhero as background.

THE CSS

.letter-container h2 a:before{
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    z-index: 0;
    width: 525px;
    height: 616px;
    background: transparent url(superhero.png) no-repeat center center;
    background-size: 40%;
    top: 0px;
    left: 50%;
    margin-left: -277px;
    transition: all 0.3s ease-in-out;
}

On hover, we will animate the background size to make the superhero larger:

.letter-container h2 a:hover:before{
    background-size: 100%;
}

The span will have the text-shadow that “elevates” the letters and on hover, we will move the letter down by adding a padding and changing the shadow:

.letter-container h2 a span{
    color: #ff3de6;
    float:left;
    position: relative;
    z-index: 100;
    transition: all 0.3s ease-in-out;
    text-shadow:  
      0px -1px 3px #cb4aba, 
      0 4px 3px #934589, 
      2px 15px 5px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 
      1px 20px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.3);
}
.letter-container h2 a span:hover{
    color: #e929d0;
    padding-top: 10px;
    text-shadow:  
      0px -1px 3px #cb4aba, 
      0 4px 3px #934589, 
      1px 1px 10px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
}

And that’s it! I hope you enjoyed creating some crazy typography effects with CSS3 and jQuery!

view demo

That’s it!

I hope you enjoyed this article and if you have questions, comments, or suggestions, let me know! Thanks for reading.

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Hover and Click Trigger For CIRCULAR Elements With jQuery

Today we want to share one possible solution to the circle hovering problem. We’ll create a plugin that will take care of the ‘mouseenter’, ‘mouseleave’ and ‘click’ events to be triggered only on the circular shape of the element and not its bounding box.

Applying a :hover pseudo-class to an element is widely known as the classic “hovering” over an element on a web page. A problem that arose with the introduction of the border-radius property is the non-realistic triggering of the hover event when entering the bounding box of the element and not just the actual visible area. This becomes extreme when we create a circle by setting the border-radius of a square to 50% (half of its outer width and height).

Today we want to share one possible solution to the circle hovering problem. We’ll create a plugin that will take care of the ‘mouseenter’, ‘mouseleave’ and ‘click’ events to be triggered only on the circular shape of the element and not its bounding box.

CIRCULAR-Elements-With-jQuery

HOW IT WORKS

In our example, we’ll be creating a circle with some kind of hover effect. The structure will simply be:

<a href="#" id="circle" class="ec-circle">
    <h3>Hovered</h3>
</a>

And the style will be the following:

.ec-circle{
    width: 420px;
    height: 420px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 210px;
    -moz-border-radius: 210px;
    border-radius: 50%;
    text-align: center;
    overflow: hidden;
    font-family:'Kelly Slab', Georgia, serif;
    background: #dda994 url(HoverClickTriggerCircle.jpg) no-repeat center center;
    box-shadow: 
        inset 0 0 1px 230px rgba(0,0,0,0.6),
        inset 0 0 0 7px #d5ad94;
    transition: box-shadow 400ms ease-in-out;
    display: block;
    outline: none;
}

Now, we will define a class for the hover effect but not a dynamic pseudo-class :hover. The idea is to apply this class then with jQuery when we enter the circular area of our element:

.ec-circle-hover{
    box-shadow: 
        inset 0 0 0 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.6),
        inset 0 0 0 20px #c18167,
        0 0 10px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
}

Only when we have JavaScript disabled, we’ll add the pseudo-class. This style can be found in the noscript.css:

.ec-circle:hover{
    box-shadow: 
        inset 0 0 0 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.6),
        inset 0 0 0 20px #c18167,
        0 0 10px rgba(0,0,0,0.3);
}

THE JAVASCRIPT

We are going to create a simple plugin that basically “redefines” the three events mentioned earlier. We’ll make the events only applicable on the circular shape:

$.CircleEventManager            = function( options, element ) {
    this.$el = $( element );
    this._init( options );
};

$.CircleEventManager.defaults   = {
    onMouseEnter    : function() { return false },
    onMouseLeave    : function() { return false },
    onClick         : function() { return false }
};

$.CircleEventManager.prototype  = {
    _init           : function( options ) {
        this.options = $.extend( true, {}, $.CircleEventManager.defaults, options );
        // set the default cursor on the element
        this.$el.css( 'cursor', 'default' );
        this._initEvents();

    },
    _initEvents     : function() {
       var _self   = this;
       this.$el.on({
           'mouseenter.circlemouse'    : function( event ) {
               var el  = $(event.target),
               circleWidth   = el.outerWidth( true ),
               circleHeight  = el.outerHeight( true ),
               circleLeft    = el.offset().left,
               circleTop     = el.offset().top,
               circlePos     = {
                       x     : circleLeft + circleWidth / 2,
                       y     : circleTop + circleHeight / 2,
                       radius: circleWidth / 2
                   };

                // save cursor type
                var cursor  = 'default';
                if( _self.$el.css('cursor') === 'pointer' || _self.$el.is('a') )
                    cursor = 'pointer';
                el.data( 'cursor', cursor );
                el.on( 'mousemove.circlemouse', function( event ) {
                var distance    = Math.sqrt( Math.pow( event.pageX - circlePos.x, 2 ) + Math.pow( event.pageY - circlePos.y, 2 ) );

                if( !Modernizr.borderradius ) {

                  // inside element / circle
                  el.css( 'cursor', el.data('cursor') ).data( 'inside', true );
                  _self.options.onMouseEnter( _self.$el );

                 }
                 else {

                   if( distance <= circlePos.radius && !el.data('inside') ) {                       // inside element / circle                       el.css( 'cursor', el.data('cursor') ).data( 'inside', true );                       _self.options.onMouseEnter( _self.$el );                                                   }                     else if( distance > circlePos.radius && el.data('inside') ) {

                      // inside element / outside circle
                      el.css( 'cursor', 'default' ).data( 'inside', false );
                      _self.options.onMouseLeave( _self.$el );
                    }
                   }
                }); 
            },
            'mouseleave.circlemouse'    : function( event ) {
              var el  = $(event.target);
              el.off('mousemove');
               if( el.data( 'inside' ) ) {
                  el.data( 'inside', false );
                  _self.options.onMouseLeave( _self.$el );
              }
             },
            'click.circlemouse'         : function( event ) {
              // allow the click only when inside the circle
                var el  = $(event.target);
                if( !el.data( 'inside' ) )
                    return false;
                else
                    _self.options.onClick( _self.$el );
            }
        });         
    },
    destroy             : function() {     
        this.$el.unbind('.circlemouse').removeData('inside').removeData('cursor'); 
    }
}

When we enter with the mouse in the square bounding box of our circle, we bind the ‘mousemove’ event to the element and like that we can track if the distance of the mouse to the center of the element if longer than the radius. If it is, we know that we are not yet hovering the circular area of the element.

hoverTrigger
Once the distance of the mouse is shorter than the radius, we know that we entered the circle and we trigger our custom ‘mouseenter’ event.
We also only allow the click event when the mouse is inside of the circle.
In our example we will then apply our plugin to the regarding element. In our case, we are adding the hover class on ‘mouseenter’ and removing it on ‘mouseleave’.

$('#circle').circlemouse({
    onMouseEnter    : function( el ) {

        el.addClass('ec-circle-hover');

    },
    onMouseLeave    : function( el ) {

        el.removeClass('ec-circle-hover');

    },
    onClick         : function( el ) {

        alert('clicked');

    }
})

Remember that the “normal” pseudo hover class is also defined in the noscript.css which gets applied when JavaScript is disabled.

view demo

Your turn

I hope you enjoyed this article and the techniques I used. Please share your comments and questions below!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Random 3D Explosions, 3D clouds – Effects with CSS 3D and jQuery

Introduction

This tutorial will try to guide you through the steps to create a 3D-like, explosions in sky or billboard-based clouds. There are a few advanced topics, mainly how 3D transformations via CSS properties work. If you want to find more information, this is a nice place to begin.

If you’re in a hurry, just check the final result.

css-3d-explosive-clouds

The tutorial is divided into sections, each with a different step to understand and follow the process, with HTML, CSS and Javascript blocks. Each step is based on the previous one, and has a link to test the code. The code in the tutorial is a simplified version of the demos, but the main differences are documented on every section.

HTML

First, we need two div elements: viewport and world. All the rest of the elements will be dynamically created.

Viewport covers the whole screen and acts as the camera plane. Since in CSS 3D Transforms there is no camera per se, think of it as a static sheet of glass through which you see a world that changes orientation relative to you. We’ll position all our world objects (or scene) inside it, and that’s what will be transformed around.

World is a div that we are going to use to anchor all our 3D elements. Transforming (rotating, translating or scaling) world will transform all our elements. For brevity and from here on, I’m using non-prefixed CSS properties. Use the vendor prefix (-webkit, -moz, -o, -ms, etc.) where appropriate.

This is all the markup we’ll need:

<div id="viewport">
    <div id="world"></div>
</div>

CSS

These next are our two CSS definitions. It’s very important to center the div that contains our scene (world in our case) in the viewport, or the scene will be rendered with an offset! Remember that you are still rotating an element that is positioned inside the document, exactly like any other 2D element.

#viewport {
	-webkit-perspective: 1000; -moz-perspective: 1000; -o-perspective: 1000; 
	position: absolute; 
	left: 0; 
	top: 0; 
	right: 0; 
	bottom: 0; 
	overflow: hidden;
	background-image: linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -o-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(bottom, rgb(69,132,180) 28%, rgb(31,71,120) 64%);
	background-image: -webkit-gradient(
			linear,
			left bottom,
			left top,
			color-stop(0.28, rgb(69,132,180)),
			color-stop(0.64, rgb(31,71,120))
	);
}

#world {
	position: absolute; 
	left: 50%; 
	top: 50%; 
	margin-left: -256px; 
	margin-top: -256px; 
	height: 512px; 
	width: 512px; 
	-webkit-transform-style: preserve-3d; 
	-moz-transform-style: preserve-3d; 
	-o-transform-style: preserve-3d; 
	pointer-events: none;
}

CSS For Adding Clouds Base

Now we start adding real 3D content. We add some new div which are positioned in the space, relatively to world. It’s esentially adding several absolute-positioned div as children of world, but using translate in 3 dimensions instead of left and top. They are centered in the middle of world by default. The width and height don’t really matter, since these new elements are containers for the actual cloud layers. For commodity, it’s better to center them (by setting margin-left and margin-top to negative half of width and height).

.cloudBase {
		position: absolute; 
		left: 256px; 
		top: 256px; 
		width: 20px; 
		height: 20px; 
		margin-left: -10px; 
		margin-top: -10px
	}

CSS for Clouds Layer

Now things start getting interesting. We add several absolute-positioned .cloudLayer div elements to each .cloudBase. These will hold our cloud textures.

.cloudLayer {
		position: absolute; 
		left: 50%; 
		top: 50%; 
		width: 256px; 
		height: 256px; 
		margin-left: -128px; 
		margin-top: -128px; 
		-webkit-transition: opacity .5s ease-out; 
		-moz-transition: opacity .5s ease-out; 
		-o-transition: opacity .5s ease-out;
	}

jQuery (JavaScript)

We add generate() and createCloud() functions to populate world. Note that random_{var} are not real variables but placeholder names for the real code, which should return a random number between the specified range.

var layers = [],
	objects = [],
	textures = [],

	world = document.getElementById( 'world' ),
	viewport = document.getElementById( 'viewport' ),

	d = 0,
	p = 400,
	worldXAngle = 0,
	worldYAngle = 0,
	computedWeights = [];

	viewport.style.webkitPerspective = p;
	viewport.style.MozPerspective = p;
	viewport.style.oPerspective = p;
	textures = [
		{ name: 'white cloud', 	file: 'cloud.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'dark cloud', 	file: 'darkCloud.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'smoke cloud', 	file: 'smoke.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'explosion', 	file: 'explosion.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'explosion 2', 	file: 'explosion2.png'	, opacity: 1, weight: 0 },
		{ name: 'box', 		file: 'box.png'		, opacity: 1, weight: 0 }
	];

	function setTextureUsage( id, mode ) {
		var modes = [ 'None', 'Few', 'Normal', 'Lot' ];
		var weights = { 'None': 0, 'Few': .3, 'Normal': .7, 'Lot': 1 };
		for( var j = 0; j < modes.length; j++ ) {
			var el = document.getElementById( 'btn' + modes[ j ] + id );
			el.className = el.className.replace( ' active', '' );
			if( modes[ j ] == mode ) {
				el.className += ' active';
				textures[ id ].weight = weights[ mode ];
			}
		}
	}
	setTextureUsage( 0, 'Few' );
	setTextureUsage( 1, 'Few' );
	setTextureUsage( 2, 'Normal' );
	setTextureUsage( 3, 'Lot' );
	setTextureUsage( 4, 'Lot' );

	generate();

	function createCloud() {

		var div = document.createElement( 'div'  );
		div.className = 'cloudBase';
		var x = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 );
		var y = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 );
		var z = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 );
		var t = 'translateX( ' + x + 'px ) translateY( ' + y + 'px ) translateZ( ' + z + 'px )';
		div.style.webkitTransform = t;
		div.style.MozTransform = t;
		div.style.oTransform = t;
		world.appendChild( div );

		for( var j = 0; j < 5 + Math.round( Math.random() * 10 ); j++ ) {
			var cloud = document.createElement( 'img' );
			cloud.style.opacity = 0;
			var r = Math.random();
			var src = 'troll.png';
			for( var k = 0; k < computedWeights.length; k++ ) { 
				if( r >= computedWeights[ k ].min && r <= computedWeights[ k ].max ) { 					
( function( img ) { img.addEventListener( 'load', function() {
 						img.style.opacity = .8;
					} ) } )( cloud );
 					src = computedWeights[ k ].src; 
}} 
cloud.setAttribute( 'src', src ); 
cloud.className = 'cloudLayer'; 		 			
var x = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 ); 
var y = 256 - ( Math.random() * 512 ); 
var z = 100 - ( Math.random() * 200 ); 
var a = Math.random() * 360; 
var s = .25 + Math.random(); 
x *= .2; y *= .2; 
cloud.data = {x: x, y: y, z: z, a: a, s: s, speed: .1 * Math.random()}; 
var t = 'translateX( ' + x + 'px ) translateY( ' + y + 'px ) translateZ( ' + z + 'px ) rotateZ( ' + a + 'deg ) scale( ' + s + ' )'; 
cloud.style.webkitTransform = t; 
cloud.style.MozTransform = t; 			
cloud.style.oTransform = t; 			
div.appendChild( cloud ); 			
layers.push( cloud ); 		} 		 		
return div; 	 	
function generate() { 		
objects = []; 		
if ( world.hasChildNodes() ) { 			
while ( world.childNodes.length >= 1 ) {
				world.removeChild( world.firstChild );       
			} 
		}
		computedWeights = [];
		var total = 0;
		for( var j = 0; j < textures.length; j++ ) { 			
if( textures[ j ].weight > 0 ) {
				total += textures[ j ].weight;
			}
		}
		var accum = 0;
		for( var j = 0; j < textures.length; j++ ) { 			
if( textures[ j ].weight > 0 ) {
				var w = textures[ j ].weight / total;
				computedWeights.push( {
					src: textures[ j ].file,
					min: accum,
					max: accum + w
				} );
				accum += w;
			}
		}
		for( var j = 0; j < 5; j++ ) {
			objects.push( createCloud() );
		}
	}

Result

For the final effect, we fill cloudLayer div for an img with a cloud texture. The textures should be PNG with alpha channel to get the effect right.

css-3d-explosive-clouds

Conclusion

Of course, you can use any texture or set of textures you want: smoke puffs, plasma clouds, green leaves, flying toasters… Just change the background-image that a specific kind of cloud layer uses. Mixing different textures in different proportions gives interesting results.

Adding elements in random order is fine, but you can also create ordered structures, like trees, duck-shaped clouds or complex explosions. Try following a 3D curve and create solid trails of clouds. Create a multiplayer game to guess the shape of a 3D cloud. The possibilities are endless!

I hope it’s been an interesting tutorial and not too hard to follow.

view demo

I hope you like the result and don’t hesitate to share your thoughts about it. Thanks for reading!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Hot Tea / Coffee with Animated Smoke Effect – jQuery & CSS

This effect has been created with some cool jQuery animation effect. For Smoke effect I have used a png transparent image. I have already updated this for IE too. As we already know transparency of png creates some bad side-effects on IE (png transparency bugs in IE). You can check the demo code and see how it’s done. Basically, the Javascript function creates some div with smoke background in random positions.  so, the effect looks more random even though it’s totally deterministic. Each smoke moves in the Y axis with a linear function and fade with a cosine function. Pretty simple effect, but effective.

css-jquery-smoke-animation-effect-of-coffee-tea

The CSS

#viewport {
position: relative;
width: 800px;
height: 600px;
overflow: hidden;
background:url('images/milk_tea.jpg') 0 0 no-repeat
}
#viewport .smoke {
position: absolute;
width: 250px;
height: 250px;
background:url('images/smoke-texture.png') no-repeat;
bottom: 150px;
margin-left:0px
}

The jQuery

Now, We are including jquery library and the easing plugin for creating this affect realistic.

<script src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-1.8.0.min.js"></script>
<script src="http://demo.web3designs.com/jquery-easing.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(function () {
    if (!$.browser.msie) {
        var a = 0;
        for (; a < 15; a += 1) {
            setTimeout(function b() {
                var a = Math.random() * 1e3 + 5e3,
                    c = $("
", {
                        "class": "smoke",
                        css: {
                            opacity: 0,
                            left: Math.random() * 200 + 80
                        }
                    });
                $(c).appendTo("#viewport");
                $.when($(c).animate({
                    opacity: 1
                }, {
                    duration: a / 4,
                    easing: "linear",
                    queue: false,
                    complete: function () {
                        $(c).animate({
                            opacity: 0
                        }, {
                            duration: a / 3,
                            easing: "linear",
                            queue: false
                        })
                    }
                }), $(c).animate({
                    bottom: $("#viewport").height()
                }, {
                    duration: a,
                    easing: "linear",
                    queue: false
                })).then(function () {
                    $(c).remove();
                    b()
                })
            }, Math.random() * 3e3)
        }
    } else {
        "use strict";
        var a = 0;
        for (; a < 15; a += 1) {
            setTimeout(function b() {
                var a = Math.random() * 1e3 + 5e3,
                    c = $("
", {
                        "class": "smoke",
                        css: {
                            left: Math.random() * 200 + 80
                        }
                    });
                $(c).appendTo("#viewport");
                $.when($(c).animate({}, {
                    duration: a / 4,
                    easing: "linear",
                    queue: false,
                    complete: function () {
                        $(c).animate({}, {
                            duration: a / 3,
                            easing: "linear",
                            queue: false
                        })
                    }
                }), $(c).animate({
                    bottom: $("#viewport").height()
                }, {
                    duration: a,
                    easing: "linear",
                    queue: false
                })).then(function () {
                    $(c).remove();
                    b()
                })
            }, Math.random() * 3e3)
        }
    }
}())</script>

view demo

Update:

I’ve done some changes in my jquery script and fix IE png transparency bug.

Thanks for reading and looking forward to read your thoughts!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Cool Animated Fire Effects with CSS3 and jQuery

This effect has been created with some jQuery for setting different CSS3 text-shadow’s in a div. You can check the demo code to see how it’s done. Basically, the Javascript function creates 3 text-shadows (white, yellow and red) with coprime “cycle durations” so the effect looks more random even though it’s totally deterministic.

css3-jquery-animated-fire-effect

Each shadow moves in the Y axis with a linear function and in the X axis with a cosine function. Pretty simple, but effective.

The CSS

#onfire{
      height:auto;
      padding-top:3em;
      font-size: 42px;
      font-weight: bold;
      text-align: center;
      color:brown;
}

The jQuery

<script type="text/javascript">
var step = 1;
function nextShadow(){
	$('#onfire span').each(function(){
	    y = parseFloat($(this).attr("y_pos"));
	    y += step + Math.random()*3;
	    $(this).attr("y_pos", y);
	    shaking = Math.random();
	    shadow1 = "0px 0px "+(y%5)+"px white";
	    shadow2 = shaking*24/y*Math.cos(y/5)*15+"px -"+(shaking*4/y+(y%17))+"px "+(shaking+(y%17))+"px red";
	    shadow3 = shaking*24/y*Math.cos(y/7)*15+"px -"+(shaking*4/y+(y%31))+"px "+(shaking+(y%31))+"px #993";
	    shadow4 = shaking*24/y*Math.cos(y/13)*15+"px -"+(shaking*4/y+(y%41))+"px "+(shaking+(y%41))+"px yellow";
	    $(this).css("text-shadow", shadow2+", "+shadow1+", "+shadow4+", "+shadow3);
	});
}
$(function(){
    $('#onfire span').each(function(){$(this).attr("y_pos","0");});
   setInterval(nextShadow, 50); 
});
</script>

view demo

Update:

I’ve added some randomisation to the algorithm, as well as an individual animation to each of the letters (which, as a drawback, makes the effect run less smooth). I’ve also added a fourth shadow in dark yellow. You can freely use the code by keeping the mention to this site on it.

Thanks for reading and looking forward to read your thoughts!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Animated Notification bubble icon with CSS3 keyframe animation

The other day, while working on a web project, I had to emphasize somehow a dynamic notification bubble. Basically, every time the notification value changes, a visual effect was needed in order to get user’s attention. So I made that using CSS3 keyframe animation.

notification-bubble-animation

The HTML

For this example, we’ll borrow the markup structure and look from my CSS3 dropdown menu.

<ul>
    <li><a href="">Dashboard</a></li>
    <li><a href="">Friends</a></li>
    <li>
    	<a href="">Message
    		<span>9</span>
    	</a>
    </li>
    <li><a href="">Games</a></li>
    <li><a href="">Settings</a></li>
</ul>

The focus will be on the <span>, which is the notification bubble that will be animated.

The CSS

The .animating class represents an CSS3 animation that uses a bezier curve.

.animating{
	animation: animate 1s cubic-bezier(0,1,1,0);			
}

@keyframes animate{
	from {
	   transform: scale(1);
	}
	to {
	   transform: scale(1.7);
	}
}

The jQuery

It’s not as easy as you might think to restart an animation and Chris Coyier wrote a good article about it.

The method I chose for this example involves using JavaScript’s setTimeout() method. So, every time the notification value changes, the .animating class is removed after a second (exactly how long the proper animation lasts).

In production, you will not need the counterValue variable. This is used just for our working example in order to be able to increment and decrement the notification value.

var counterValue = parseInt($('.bubble').html()); // Get the current bubble value

function removeAnimation(){
	setTimeout(function() {
		$('.bubble').removeClass('animating')
	}, 1000);			
}

$('#decrease').on('click',function(){
	counterValue--; // decrement
	$('.bubble').html(counterValue).addClass('animating'); // animate it
	removeAnimation(); // remove CSS animating class
})

$('#increase').on('click',function(){
	counterValue++; // increment
	$('.bubble').html(counterValue).addClass('animating'); // animate it
        removeAnimation(); // remove CSS animating class

view demo

Simple, but effective

I think this is a simple and practical example on how to use a CSS3 animation to enhance user experience. Further, you can experiment with the bezier curve values and come up with some other cool effects.

Thanks for reading and looking forward to read your thoughts!

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Image Sprites – How to merge multiple images, and how to split them

An Image Sprites is a single image which is merged with multiple images. The reason why Image Sprites are needed instead of inserting multiple images into a page is to SAVE network bandwidth as well as reduce the number of server requests. Since inserting many images into a page will take longer time to load the pages, merging images into a single will help reduce loading time. For these reasons, I would recommend to use “CSS Image Sprites” function instead of inserting multiple images. Unfortunately, most of designers/developers not support this function as default, but through this tutorial, you would be able to merge multiple images into a single image as well as manipulating CSS.

“Image Sprites” is strongly recommended for Web, because Web themes have many graphics as default. Therefore, reducing the number of images is necessary to let people as well as search engines visit your sites faster than before. Some times ago, I have already posted an example of a cartoon type animation with help of Image Sprites.

Let me give you an example for easier understandings. Here is lots of avatars I have to put into a page. Without Image Sprites, I have to insert 24 individual avatars into a page. It will generate 24 requests of your web server so that it will take a long time to load.

24 image files to load / 24 requests

Just 1 image file to load / 1 request

With using “Image Sprites”, Only one request and one loading time will be generated. Which one do you think better?

In addition, with the help of “Image Sprites”, you can make use of hover effect more easily. In this tutorial, I will describe how to use Image Sprites with hover effects (View Demo).

To get started (Preparation)

  1. You may need to prepare more than two same size images to be inserted into a page like the avatar image file above.
  2. For this tutorial, I will use these 6 images below as an example. All six buttons’ sizes are equal as 33×33.

3 left images will be used for normal links, and the rest of images will be used for hover effects.

This single image below will be used for “Image Sprites”.

Instruction

  1. Download .zip file or View Demo.
  2. Extract the compressed file onto your hard drive.
  3. Open “imagesprites.html” file using any TextEditor (Notepad/Dreamweaver).
  4. I will let you know some parts you need to replace so that you better modify some codes using text editor.
  5. This code is for this example so that your code will be different. You can refer to this code about how it works.
  6. Take a look at this part of the source code below:
.prev-button {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background:url('/images/controllers.png') 0 0
}
a:hover .prev-button {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background: url('/images/controllers.png') 0px -33px
}
.play-button  {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background:url('/images/controllers.png') -33px 0
}
a:hover .play-button  {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background: url('/images/controllers.png') -33px -33px
}
.next-button  {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background:url('/images/controllers.png') -66px 0
}
a:hover .next-button  {
    width: 33px; height: 33px; border: 0px; background: url('/images/controllers.png') -66px -33px
}
image sprite
 As you can see, the first image’s position is “0 0” (.prev-button). The second image (.play-button) position is “-33px 0”. Because each width is set to 33px. Hence, the next image’s position should be “-66px 0”. On the other hand, for hover images, their Y position should be “-33px”, because each height is set to 33px.
  1. If you have set all, the next is to insert HTML codes for each image class like below:
<body style="background: transparent; margin: 0pt; ">
<div>
<a href="URL" target="_top"><img class="prev-button" src="/images/spacer.gif" /></a>
</div>

<div>
<a href="URL" target="_top"><img class="play-button" src="/images/spacer.gif" /></a>
</div>

<div>
<a href="URL" target="_top"><img class="next-button" src="/images/spacer.gif" /></a>
</div>
</body>
  1. If you don’t want an image to be linked, remove href= “URL” target= “_top” tag.
  2. Replace class names such as “prev-button”, “play-button”, and “next-button” to yours.
  3. Make sure the classes doesn’t have “.” at the very front.
  4. Modifying codes is done. You can apply this technique to other merged images.
  5. Make sure “spacer.gif” as well as your merged image file are also uploaded to the right place such as “/images/”.
  6. You are ready to check how “Image Sprites” works correctly. You will reduce the number of server requests as well as save network bandwidth with this CSS technique.

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

Unquoted font family names in CSS

CSS

Are the quotes in font-family: 'Comic Sans MS' required, or not?

According to the the CSS validator, the quotes are supposed to be there in this case because the font family name contains spaces:

Family names containing whitespace should be quoted. If quoting is omitted, any whitespace characters before and after the name are ignored and any sequence of whitespace characters inside the name is converted to a single space.

However, this is an error in the CSS validator. The warning message suggests that all font family names containing whitespace should be quoted, which is simply not true. font-family: Comic Sans MS (without quotes) is perfectly valid CSS that works the way you’d expect it to.

In reality, it’s a bit more complex. To grok the rules on font family names, we need to understand the difference between CSS strings and identifiers first.

Strings and identifiers

The spec says the following about strings:

Strings can either be written with double quotes or with single quotes.

Identifiers are defined as follows:

In CSS, identifiers (including element names, classes, and IDs in selectors) can contain only the characters[a-zA-Z0-9] and ISO 10646 characters U+00A0 and higher, plus the hyphen (-) and the underscore (_).

ISO 10646 defines the Universal Character Set, which correlates to the Unicode standard. Note that they’re actually talking about the hyphen-minus character — not the hyphen character, which is U+2010. The code point for hyphen-minus is U+002D, and for underscore (low line) it’s U+005F. The highest code point currently allowed by Unicode is U+10FFFF. So, any character matching the regular expression [-_\u00A0-\u10FFFF] is allowed in an identifier.

The spec continues:

[Identifiers] cannot start with a digit, two hyphens, or a hyphen followed by a digit. Identifiers can also contain escaped characters and any ISO 10646 character as a numeric code […]. For instance, the identifier B&W? may be written as B\&W\? or B\26 W\3F .

Translated into regex: any string that matches ^(-?\d|--) is not a valid CSS identifier.

Whitespace

Both the CSS 2.1 and CSS3 Fonts Module Level 3 specs say:

Font family names must either be given quoted as strings, or unquoted as a sequence of one or more identifiers. This means most punctuation characters and digits at the start of each token must be escaped in unquoted font family names.

Note: “a sequence of one or more identifiers” implies that multiple space-separated identifiers will form a single font family name. Therefore, font-family: Comic Sans MS is valid, and equivalent to font-family: 'Comic Sans MS'. The former consists of three space-separated identifiers, the latter is simply a string.

This is clarified a few paragraphs down in the spec:

If a sequence of identifiers is given as a font family name, the computed value is the name converted to a string by joining all the identifiers in the sequence by single spaces.

The aforementioned CSS validator warning describes what happens if leading or trailing whitespace is used around identifier sequences:

[A]ny whitespace characters before and after the name are ignored, and any sequence of whitespace characters inside the name is converted to a single space.

This is implied by the spec text, too: an unescaped whitespace character can never be part of an identifier, so it can never start a “sequence of identifiers”.

Generic family keywords

The spec defines the following generic family keywords: serifsans-serifcursivefantasy, andmonospace. These keywords can be used as a general fallback mechanism, in case the desired font choices are not available. Authors are encouraged to append a generic font family as a last alternative for improved robustness. As keywords, they must not be quoted.

In other words, font-family: sans-serif means that a generic sans-serif font family will be used, whilefont-family: 'sans-serif' (with quotes) refers to an actual font that goes by the name of sans-serif. A very important difference!

Other keyword values

The same behavior applies to a few other keywords, too:

Font family names that happen to be the same as a keyword value (inheritserifsans-serifmonospace,fantasy, and cursive) must be quoted to prevent confusion with the keywords with the same names. The keywords initial and default are reserved for future use and must also be quoted when used as font names. User agents must not consider these keywords as matching the <family-name> type.

Note that all keywords are case-insensitive. For example, Monospacemonospace, and mOnOsPaCe all refer to the same keyword, and if you want to use a font with that exact family name rather than the default keyword value, you’ll need to quote it.

Summary

As long as the only disallowed characters in an otherwise valid identifier are single U+0020 space characters, and all space-separated parts are valid identifiers too, the identifier sequence can be used as an unquoted font family name (unless it’s a keyword, but there are no keywords with spaces in them).

If a font family name matches a keyword, it must be quoted to form a string.

If you want to use an invalid CSS identifier as (part of) a font family name, you’ll need to quote it to form a string instead; or you could just escape any special characters so it can remain an unquoted identifier.

Here are some example font-family declarations:

/* Invalid because `/` is not allowed in an identifier: */ font-family: Red/Black;
 /* Valid — an escaped `/` symbol is allowed in an identifier: */ font-family: Red\/Black;
 /* Invalid because a string cannot be combined with an identifier: */ font-family: 'Lucida' Grande;
 /* Valid — it’s a single string: */ font-family: 'Lucida Grande';
 /* Valid — it’s a space-separated sequence of two identifiers: */ font-family: Lucida Grande;
 /* Valid — it’s still a space-separated sequence of two identifiers: */ font-family: Lucida     Grande;
 /* Invalid because `!` is not allowed in an identifier: */ font-family: Ahem!;
 /* Valid — it’s a string: */ font-family: 'Ahem!';
 /* Valid — an escaped `!` is allowed in an identifier: */ font-family: Ahem\!;
 /* Invalid because an identifier cannot start with a digit: */ font-family: Hawaii 5-0;
 /* Valid — it’s a string: */ font-family: 'Hawaii 5-0';
 /* Valid — `\35 ` (including the space) is an escape sequence for `5`: */ font-family: Hawaii \35 -0;
 /* Valid — `\ ` (including the space) is an escape sequence for ` `: */ font-family: Hawaii\ 5-0;
 /* Invalid — `$` is not allowed in an identifier: */ font-family: $42;
 /* Valid — an escaped `$` symbol is allowed in an identifier: */ font-family: \$42;
 /* Valid — `€` is allowed in an identifier: */ font-family: €42;

Bonus puzzle: Other than keywords, I can only think of one font family name that can’t be used without quotes — there is no way to escape it in an identifier. Do you know which one?

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar

jQuery Plugin for Cartoon-like Background Image Sprite Animation – AniDG – (alernative to animated Gif)

What is AniDg?

AniDg is a simple plugin for jQuery which allows you animate background images. The plugin is basically an alternative to the animated GIF but with several benefits. At first, it’s always better to use an animated GIF as this format is supported by all browsers without any JavaScript code or additional markup, but the “dark side” of it is that an animated GIF allows only 256 colors and you cannot control animation in any way. The AniDg loads a long vertical image and changes its background position with the speed you setup, giving you more control of the animation. For Better quality you can call PNG, JPG, GIF images in background image sprite as per your requirements.

Demo

jQuery Plugin AniDG Background image animation

Features

  1. Light-weight script (Only 1Kb :))
  2. Easy to integrate
  3. Fully customizable via CSS
  4. Works with all modern browsers 🙂

How to Use

METHOD #1: EASY

Simply place the following code anywhere inside thetag of your webpage:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://demo.web3designs.com/jquery-ani.dg.min.js"></script>

METHOD #2: ADVANCED

STEP ONE: Download AniDg.zip or http://demo.web3designs.com/AniDg.zip. The package already contains all files used in this demo.

STEP TWO: Unzip and place the file jquery-ani.dg.min.js in the same location as the webpage that is displaying the animation. (Make sure paths to files are correct.)

STEP THREE: include the following code in the <head>…</head> section of your webpage:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="jquery-ani.dg.min.js"></script>

3.) Add a style containing the url to your background with animation (this may be added to a separate CSS document or inside the <head>…</head> tag):

<style type="text/css">
#animation-1 {
background: url(images/sample-animation.gif) no-repeat left top;
}
</style>

4.) Add an empty DIV which will display animation in your document:

<div id="animation-1"></div>

5.) Add the following code to your <head>…</head> tag to initialize AniDg and start the animation.

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
$('#animation-1').anidg({ frameWidth: 100, frameHeight: 100, speed: 100, totalFrames: 19 });
$('#animation-1').anidg.play();
});
</script>

That’s it 😉 Click the Demo button to see it in action.

Public Functions

anidg.play()
Start playing animation.

anidg.pause()
Pause animation.

anidg.stop()
Stop animation.

Parameters

The table below contains a list of parameters accepted by the .anidg() function.

Parameters Description
frameWidth Width of a single frame.
frameHeight Height of a single frame.
speed Animation speed.
totalFrames Total frames in the animation.
loop Loop an animation or not. By default, value is true.

Posted by: Dhiraj kumar